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Mark 10:46-52

The Word of God

As Jesus left Jericho with his disciples and a great crowd, Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting at the side of the road. When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout and cry out: Son of David, have pity on me! And many of them scolded him and told him to keep quiet, but he only shouted all the louder: Son of David, have pity on me! Jesus stopped and said: Call him here. So they called the blind man over: Courage, they said, get up. He is calling you. So throwing off his cloak, he jumped up and went to Jesus. Then Jesus spoke: What do you want me to do for you? The blind man said to him, Rabbuni, let me see again. Jesus said to him: Go, your faith has saved you. And at once his sight returned and he followed him along the road.

Mark 10:46-52
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, I sometimes open my eyes in the morning, and do not notice the sunshine, the green of trees, the colours in my room, the warmth or sorrow in the faces around me. If I had been blind, like Bartimaeus in today's gospel, I would long to open my eyes and see all that is to be seen. I could not have enough of this light-filled world around me.
    • Give me a relish, Lord, for all that my eyes can take in: not the pre-selected shots of the TV screen, but the endlessly varied landscape and peoplescape that surrounds me. I pray with Bartimaeus: /Master, let me receive my sight/.
    • Without his cloak the blind man could be even more lost - he would lose protection from the elements. It was one of his most essential possessions. In going to Jesus, he let it go. In prayer there is much letting-go. We hand over disappointments, hurts and grief as best we can. We hand them over to the one who loves us and gives much more in return.
    • Bartimaeus was an irritation to the crowd; they asked him to keep quiet, they were embarrassed by the attention he was drawing. Might there be some part of me that I prefer to keep silent? I lead all my needs be given expression as I am here in prayer.
    • The fickle crowd encouraged Bartimaeus once they heard Jesus call him forward. I pray for the courage I need to recognise what is important to Jesus and to bring it to life.
    • I listen to Jesus speak to me as he spoke to Bartimaeus. He asks, ‘What do you want me to do for you?'
    • Like the people's who scolded Bartimaeus, telling him to be quiet and not to bring shame on them, I may sometimes prefer to keep the less presentable parts of my life out of Jesus' sight. Thinking of this scene, I realise that Jesus wants to stop, to listen to my plea for help and to cure me.
    • Bartimaeus threw off his cloak - his only protection - and, being blind, risked not finding it again. I allow myself to be before Jesus, unshrouded, seen as I am, expressing my need in trust.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, I sometimes open my eyes in the morning, and do not notice the sunshine, the green of trees, the colours in my room, the warmth or sorrow in the faces around me. If I had been blind, like Bartimaeus in today's gospel, I would long to open my eyes and see all that is to be seen. I could not have enough of this light-filled world around me.
    • Give me a relish, Lord, for all that my eyes can take in: not the pre-selected shots of the TV screen, but the endlessly varied landscape and peoplescape that surrounds me. I pray with Bartimaeus: /Master, let me receive my sight/.
    • Without his cloak the blind man could be even more lost - he would lose protection from the elements. It was one of his most essential possessions. In going to Jesus, he let it go. In prayer there is much letting-go. We hand over disappointments, hurts and grief as best we can. We hand them over to the one who loves us and gives much more in return.
    • Bartimaeus was an irritation to the crowd; they asked him to keep quiet, they were embarrassed by the attention he was drawing. Might there be some part of me that I prefer to keep silent? I lead all my needs be given expression as I am here in prayer.
    • The fickle crowd encouraged Bartimaeus once they heard Jesus call him forward. I pray for the courage I need to recognise what is important to Jesus and to bring it to life.
    • I listen to Jesus speak to me as he spoke to Bartimaeus. He asks, ‘What do you want me to do for you?'
    • Like the people's who scolded Bartimaeus, telling him to be quiet and not to bring shame on them, I may sometimes prefer to keep the less presentable parts of my life out of Jesus' sight. Thinking of this scene, I realise that Jesus wants to stop, to listen to my plea for help and to cure me.
    • Bartimaeus threw off his cloak - his only protection - and, being blind, risked not finding it again. I allow myself to be before Jesus, unshrouded, seen as I am, expressing my need in trust.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, I sometimes open my eyes in the morning, and do not notice the sunshine, the green of trees, the colours in my room, the warmth or sorrow in the faces around me. If I had been blind, like Bartimaeus in today's gospel, I would long to open my eyes and see all that is to be seen. I could not have enough of this light-filled world around me.
    • Give me a relish, Lord, for all that my eyes can take in: not the pre-selected shots of the TV screen, but the endlessly varied landscape and peoplescape that surrounds me. I pray with Bartimaeus: /Master, let me receive my sight/.
    • Without his cloak the blind man could be even more lost - he would lose protection from the elements. It was one of his most essential possessions. In going to Jesus, he let it go. In prayer there is much letting-go. We hand over disappointments, hurts and grief as best we can. We hand them over to the one who loves us and gives much more in return.
    • Bartimaeus was an irritation to the crowd; they asked him to keep quiet, they were embarrassed by the attention he was drawing. Might there be some part of me that I prefer to keep silent? I lead all my needs be given expression as I am here in prayer.
    • The fickle crowd encouraged Bartimaeus once they heard Jesus call him forward. I pray for the courage I need to recognise what is important to Jesus and to bring it to life.
    • I listen to Jesus speak to me as he spoke to Bartimaeus. He asks, ‘What do you want me to do for you?'
    • Like the people's who scolded Bartimaeus, telling him to be quiet and not to bring shame on them, I may sometimes prefer to keep the less presentable parts of my life out of Jesus' sight. Thinking of this scene, I realise that Jesus wants to stop, to listen to my plea for help and to cure me.
    • Bartimaeus threw off his cloak - his only protection - and, being blind, risked not finding it again. I allow myself to be before Jesus, unshrouded, seen as I am, expressing my need in trust.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, I sometimes open my eyes in the morning, and do not notice the sunshine, the green of trees, the colours in my room, the warmth or sorrow in the faces around me. If I had been blind, like Bartimaeus in today's gospel, I would long to open my eyes and see all that is to be seen. I could not have enough of this light-filled world around me.
    • Give me a relish, Lord, for all that my eyes can take in: not the pre-selected shots of the TV screen, but the endlessly varied landscape and peoplescape that surrounds me. I pray with Bartimaeus: /Master, let me receive my sight/.
    • Without his cloak the blind man could be even more lost - he would lose protection from the elements. It was one of his most essential possessions. In going to Jesus, he let it go. In prayer there is much letting-go. We hand over disappointments, hurts and grief as best we can. We hand them over to the one who loves us and gives much more in return.
    • Bartimaeus was an irritation to the crowd; they asked him to keep quiet, they were embarrassed by the attention he was drawing. Might there be some part of me that I prefer to keep silent? I lead all my needs be given expression as I am here in prayer.
    • The fickle crowd encouraged Bartimaeus once they heard Jesus call him forward. I pray for the courage I need to recognise what is important to Jesus and to bring it to life.
    • I listen to Jesus speak to me as he spoke to Bartimaeus. He asks, ‘What do you want me to do for you?'
    • Like the people's who scolded Bartimaeus, telling him to be quiet and not to bring shame on them, I may sometimes prefer to keep the less presentable parts of my life out of Jesus' sight. Thinking of this scene, I realise that Jesus wants to stop, to listen to my plea for help and to cure me.
    • Bartimaeus threw off his cloak - his only protection - and, being blind, risked not finding it again. I allow myself to be before Jesus, unshrouded, seen as I am, expressing my need in trust.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, I sometimes open my eyes in the morning, and do not notice the sunshine, the green of trees, the colours in my room, the warmth or sorrow in the faces around me. If I had been blind, like Bartimaeus in today's gospel, I would long to open my eyes and see all that is to be seen. I could not have enough of this light-filled world around me.
    • Give me a relish, Lord, for all that my eyes can take in: not the pre-selected shots of the TV screen, but the endlessly varied landscape and peoplescape that surrounds me. I pray with Bartimaeus: /Master, let me receive my sight/.
    • Without his cloak the blind man could be even more lost - he would lose protection from the elements. It was one of his most essential possessions. In going to Jesus, he let it go. In prayer there is much letting-go. We hand over disappointments, hurts and grief as best we can. We hand them over to the one who loves us and gives much more in return.
    • Bartimaeus was an irritation to the crowd; they asked him to keep quiet, they were embarrassed by the attention he was drawing. Might there be some part of me that I prefer to keep silent? I lead all my needs be given expression as I am here in prayer.
    • The fickle crowd encouraged Bartimaeus once they heard Jesus call him forward. I pray for the courage I need to recognise what is important to Jesus and to bring it to life.
    • I listen to Jesus speak to me as he spoke to Bartimaeus. He asks, ‘What do you want me to do for you?'
    • Like the people's who scolded Bartimaeus, telling him to be quiet and not to bring shame on them, I may sometimes prefer to keep the less presentable parts of my life out of Jesus' sight. Thinking of this scene, I realise that Jesus wants to stop, to listen to my plea for help and to cure me.
    • Bartimaeus threw off his cloak - his only protection - and, being blind, risked not finding it again. I allow myself to be before Jesus, unshrouded, seen as I am, expressing my need in trust.