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John 21:1-17

The Word of God

After these things Jesus showed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias; and he showed himself in this way. Gathered there together were Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples. Simon Peter said to them, "I am going fishing." They said to him, "We will go with you." They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing. Just after daybreak, Jesus stood on the beach; but the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, "Children, you have no fish, have you?" They answered him, "No." He said to them, "Cast the net to the right side of the boat, and you will find some." So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in because there were so many fish. That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, "It is the Lord!" When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on some clothes, for he was naked, and jumped into the sea. But the other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, only about a hundred yards off. When they had gone ashore, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish on it, and bread. Jesus said to them, "Bring some of the fish that you have just caught." So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred fifty-three of them; and though there were so many, the net was not torn. Jesus said to them, "Come and have breakfast." Now none of the disciples dared to ask him, "Who are you?" because they knew it was the Lord. Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. This was now the third time that Jesus appeared to the disciples after he was raised from the dead. When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, "Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Feed my lambs." A second time he said to him, "Simon son of John, do you love me?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Tend my sheep." He said to him the third time, "Simon son of John, do you love me?" Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, "Do you love me?" And he said to him, "Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Feed my sheep”.

John 21:1-17
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Am I like the disciples? They had seen the risen Lord, spoken with him, been missioned by him. They should be energetic about their new task. Yet here they are, going fishing! Do I live out my days as if life were just ordinary and humdrum? As if the resurrection had not occurred? But the Holy Spirit is commissioning me too to spread the Good News! Nothing can be ‘ordinary’ any more.
    • Jesus, you are always inviting me to ‘come and have breakfast’. You and I are table companions. You are my unseen host. May every meal be a sacred space where I remember you. May I be hospitable to the hungry as you are.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • That number, 153, has fascinated commentators, convinced that it must be symbolic. Saint Jerome held that there are 153 species of fish, so 153 signifies a certain totality; and the story means that some day all the peoples of the world would be gathered together to Jesus Christ. Lord, I would rather contemplate you preparing breakfast, ensuring that each of the weary fishermen is comfortable, and then, as the sun rises over the lake, opening to us the possibility of a new dawn beyond death.
    • 'It is the Lord', 'The Lord is near', 'Come Lord Jesus.' Many of the mantra sentences of prayer can deepen our times of prayer. Peter's heart must have jumped higher than the fish when he realised that Jesus was alive, and once again inviting them to follow him. Every time he said, 'It is the Lord' for the rest of his life, he would know that Jesus' real presence near him. . Choose your mantra and practice it often!
    • You might imagine yourself walking on a beach towards a group around a fire. The smell of breakfast is in the air. You realise that it is Jesus and his group of followers. He has been raised from death. As you come near the group, you notice Jesus turns towards you and you hear his invitation, 'Come and have breakfast'. Let that picture guide your prayer today.
    • This is 'the morning after'. The disciples think they are back to square one. They revert to their old occupations, the adventure with Jesus apparently over. In our times of rejection, he is present, waiting for us to recognize him and find new hope, a new beginning.
    • Often in the Gospels, Jesus shares meals with his friends. We see him here as host, solicitous of the disciples' need - for food but, more deeply, for his companionship. This is what he offers in the nourishment of prayer and in the Eucharist.
    • The disciples labouring all night and catching nothing is a little like what prayer can seem to us. Jesus encouraged them not to give up, to stay with the task. He knows there is benefit for me too, if I persevere.
    • The charcoal fire might have reminded Peter of the High Priest's palace and his triple denial. Now Jesus gives him the opportunity to experience total forgiveness. His triple confession draws him back into full friendship. Jesus is always offering me forgiveness, always seeking to reconcile me to himself, to draw me into ever fuller friendship, enabling me to share this with others.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • That number, 153, has fascinated commentators, convinced that it must be symbolic. Saint Jerome held that there are 153 species of fish, so 153 signifies a certain totality; and the story means that some day all the peoples of the world would be gathered together to Jesus Christ. Lord, I would rather contemplate you preparing breakfast, ensuring that each of the weary fishermen is comfortable, and then, as the sun rises over the lake, opening to us the possibility of a new dawn beyond death.
    • 'It is the Lord', 'The Lord is near', 'Come Lord Jesus.' Many of the mantra sentences of prayer can deepen our times of prayer. Peter's heart must have jumped higher than the fish when he realised that Jesus was alive, and once again inviting them to follow him. Every time he said, 'It is the Lord' for the rest of his life, he would know that Jesus' real presence near him. . Choose your mantra and practice it often!
    • You might imagine yourself walking on a beach towards a group around a fire. The smell of breakfast is in the air. You realise that it is Jesus and his group of followers. He has been raised from death. As you come near the group, you notice Jesus turns towards you and you hear his invitation, 'Come and have breakfast'. Let that picture guide your prayer today.
    • This is 'the morning after'. The disciples think they are back to square one. They revert to their old occupations, the adventure with Jesus apparently over. In our times of rejection, he is present, waiting for us to recognize him and find new hope, a new beginning.
    • Often in the Gospels, Jesus shares meals with his friends. We see him here as host, solicitous of the disciples' need - for food but, more deeply, for his companionship. This is what he offers in the nourishment of prayer and in the Eucharist.
    • The disciples labouring all night and catching nothing is a little like what prayer can seem to us. Jesus encouraged them not to give up, to stay with the task. He knows there is benefit for me too, if I persevere.
    • The charcoal fire might have reminded Peter of the High Priest's palace and his triple denial. Now Jesus gives him the opportunity to experience total forgiveness. His triple confession draws him back into full friendship. Jesus is always offering me forgiveness, always seeking to reconcile me to himself, to draw me into ever fuller friendship, enabling me to share this with others.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • That number, 153, has fascinated commentators, convinced that it must be symbolic. Saint Jerome held that there are 153 species of fish, so 153 signifies a certain totality; and the story means that some day all the peoples of the world would be gathered together to Jesus Christ. Lord, I would rather contemplate you preparing breakfast, ensuring that each of the weary fishermen is comfortable, and then, as the sun rises over the lake, opening to us the possibility of a new dawn beyond death.
    • 'It is the Lord', 'The Lord is near', 'Come Lord Jesus.' Many of the mantra sentences of prayer can deepen our times of prayer. Peter's heart must have jumped higher than the fish when he realised that Jesus was alive, and once again inviting them to follow him. Every time he said, 'It is the Lord' for the rest of his life, he would know that Jesus' real presence near him. . Choose your mantra and practice it often!
    • You might imagine yourself walking on a beach towards a group around a fire. The smell of breakfast is in the air. You realise that it is Jesus and his group of followers. He has been raised from death. As you come near the group, you notice Jesus turns towards you and you hear his invitation, 'Come and have breakfast'. Let that picture guide your prayer today.
    • This is 'the morning after'. The disciples think they are back to square one. They revert to their old occupations, the adventure with Jesus apparently over. In our times of rejection, he is present, waiting for us to recognize him and find new hope, a new beginning.
    • Often in the Gospels, Jesus shares meals with his friends. We see him here as host, solicitous of the disciples' need - for food but, more deeply, for his companionship. This is what he offers in the nourishment of prayer and in the Eucharist.
    • The disciples labouring all night and catching nothing is a little like what prayer can seem to us. Jesus encouraged them not to give up, to stay with the task. He knows there is benefit for me too, if I persevere.
    • The charcoal fire might have reminded Peter of the High Priest's palace and his triple denial. Now Jesus gives him the opportunity to experience total forgiveness. His triple confession draws him back into full friendship. Jesus is always offering me forgiveness, always seeking to reconcile me to himself, to draw me into ever fuller friendship, enabling me to share this with others.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • That number, 153, has fascinated commentators, convinced that it must be symbolic. Saint Jerome held that there are 153 species of fish, so 153 signifies a certain totality; and the story means that some day all the peoples of the world would be gathered together to Jesus Christ. Lord, I would rather contemplate you preparing breakfast, ensuring that each of the weary fishermen is comfortable, and then, as the sun rises over the lake, opening to us the possibility of a new dawn beyond death.
    • 'It is the Lord', 'The Lord is near', 'Come Lord Jesus.' Many of the mantra sentences of prayer can deepen our times of prayer. Peter's heart must have jumped higher than the fish when he realised that Jesus was alive, and once again inviting them to follow him. Every time he said, 'It is the Lord' for the rest of his life, he would know that Jesus' real presence near him. . Choose your mantra and practice it often!
    • You might imagine yourself walking on a beach towards a group around a fire. The smell of breakfast is in the air. You realise that it is Jesus and his group of followers. He has been raised from death. As you come near the group, you notice Jesus turns towards you and you hear his invitation, 'Come and have breakfast'. Let that picture guide your prayer today.
    • This is 'the morning after'. The disciples think they are back to square one. They revert to their old occupations, the adventure with Jesus apparently over. In our times of rejection, he is present, waiting for us to recognize him and find new hope, a new beginning.
    • Often in the Gospels, Jesus shares meals with his friends. We see him here as host, solicitous of the disciples' need - for food but, more deeply, for his companionship. This is what he offers in the nourishment of prayer and in the Eucharist.
    • The disciples labouring all night and catching nothing is a little like what prayer can seem to us. Jesus encouraged them not to give up, to stay with the task. He knows there is benefit for me too, if I persevere.
    • The charcoal fire might have reminded Peter of the High Priest's palace and his triple denial. Now Jesus gives him the opportunity to experience total forgiveness. His triple confession draws him back into full friendship. Jesus is always offering me forgiveness, always seeking to reconcile me to himself, to draw me into ever fuller friendship, enabling me to share this with others.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • That number, 153, has fascinated commentators, convinced that it must be symbolic. Saint Jerome held that there are 153 species of fish, so 153 signifies a certain totality; and the story means that some day all the peoples of the world would be gathered together to Jesus Christ. Lord, I would rather contemplate you preparing breakfast, ensuring that each of the weary fishermen is comfortable, and then, as the sun rises over the lake, opening to us the possibility of a new dawn beyond death.
    • 'It is the Lord', 'The Lord is near', 'Come Lord Jesus.' Many of the mantra sentences of prayer can deepen our times of prayer. Peter's heart must have jumped higher than the fish when he realised that Jesus was alive, and once again inviting them to follow him. Every time he said, 'It is the Lord' for the rest of his life, he would know that Jesus' real presence near him. . Choose your mantra and practice it often!
    • You might imagine yourself walking on a beach towards a group around a fire. The smell of breakfast is in the air. You realise that it is Jesus and his group of followers. He has been raised from death. As you come near the group, you notice Jesus turns towards you and you hear his invitation, 'Come and have breakfast'. Let that picture guide your prayer today.
    • This is 'the morning after'. The disciples think they are back to square one. They revert to their old occupations, the adventure with Jesus apparently over. In our times of rejection, he is present, waiting for us to recognize him and find new hope, a new beginning.
    • Often in the Gospels, Jesus shares meals with his friends. We see him here as host, solicitous of the disciples' need - for food but, more deeply, for his companionship. This is what he offers in the nourishment of prayer and in the Eucharist.
    • The disciples labouring all night and catching nothing is a little like what prayer can seem to us. Jesus encouraged them not to give up, to stay with the task. He knows there is benefit for me too, if I persevere.
    • The charcoal fire might have reminded Peter of the High Priest's palace and his triple denial. Now Jesus gives him the opportunity to experience total forgiveness. His triple confession draws him back into full friendship. Jesus is always offering me forgiveness, always seeking to reconcile me to himself, to draw me into ever fuller friendship, enabling me to share this with others.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • That number, 153, has fascinated commentators, convinced that it must be symbolic. Saint Jerome held that there are 153 species of fish, so 153 signifies a certain totality; and the story means that some day all the peoples of the world would be gathered together to Jesus Christ. Lord, I would rather contemplate you preparing breakfast, ensuring that each of the weary fishermen is comfortable, and then, as the sun rises over the lake, opening to us the possibility of a new dawn beyond death.
    • 'It is the Lord', 'The Lord is near', 'Come Lord Jesus.' Many of the mantra sentences of prayer can deepen our times of prayer. Peter's heart must have jumped higher than the fish when he realised that Jesus was alive, and once again inviting them to follow him. Every time he said, 'It is the Lord' for the rest of his life, he would know that Jesus' real presence near him. . Choose your mantra and practice it often!
    • You might imagine yourself walking on a beach towards a group around a fire. The smell of breakfast is in the air. You realise that it is Jesus and his group of followers. He has been raised from death. As you come near the group, you notice Jesus turns towards you and you hear his invitation, 'Come and have breakfast'. Let that picture guide your prayer today.
    • This is 'the morning after'. The disciples think they are back to square one. They revert to their old occupations, the adventure with Jesus apparently over. In our times of rejection, he is present, waiting for us to recognize him and find new hope, a new beginning.
    • Often in the Gospels, Jesus shares meals with his friends. We see him here as host, solicitous of the disciples' need - for food but, more deeply, for his companionship. This is what he offers in the nourishment of prayer and in the Eucharist.
    • The disciples labouring all night and catching nothing is a little like what prayer can seem to us. Jesus encouraged them not to give up, to stay with the task. He knows there is benefit for me too, if I persevere.
    • The charcoal fire might have reminded Peter of the High Priest's palace and his triple denial. Now Jesus gives him the opportunity to experience total forgiveness. His triple confession draws him back into full friendship. Jesus is always offering me forgiveness, always seeking to reconcile me to himself, to draw me into ever fuller friendship, enabling me to share this with others.