User Settings

  • Background
  • Fade speed
  • Music
  • Text size
Choose a backgound theme.
Choose the speed the daily prayer fades between stages.
Choose music to play during the daily prayer.
Choose the size of the text for your daily prayer.

Mark 3:1-6

The Word of God

Again he entered the synagogue, and a man was there who had a withered hand. They watched him to see whether he would cure him on the sabbath, so that they might accuse him. And he said to the man who had the withered hand, "Come forward." Then he said to them, "Is it lawful to do good or to do harm on the sabbath, to save life or to kill?" But they were silent. He looked around at them with anger; he was grieved at their hardness of heart and said to the man, "Stretch out your hand." He stretched it out, and his hand was restored. The Pharisees went out and immediately conspired with the Herodians against him, how to destroy him.

Mark 3:1-6
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • In another example of how Jesus shows his feelings, we are told that he was both grieved and angry at their stubborn attitude. Grieved because their attitude was so inappropriate for people who believed they were close to God. Angry because of the terrible injustice they were prepared to impose on this man.
    • As we have seen, for Jesus it is not a matter of keeping or breaking laws but doing acts of love. St Paul tells us - “If I have not love, I am nothing.”
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • I walk with Jesus to the synagogue to worship God and also to listen to Jesus preaching. Again I see that his immediate compassion for human need will get him into trouble. I see the faces of those for whom the safety of the Law is more important than care of the needy. Law gives them power and security, and their hearts have become hardened to what is human. I watch Jesus: he doesn’t back off from confrontation. Instead he grieves, and grows angry too. The man with the withered hand is shaking with fear of what may happen next. I watch, transfixed, as his hand is restored.
    • As the congregation breaks up I overhear the men of power plotting to destroy Jesus because they can’t control him. I hurry off to warn him that his life is in danger. I find myself trembling because I’m a disciple and might get the same treatment as is being planned for Jesus. He and I talk long into the night.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It’s the Sabbath and we are gathered at the synagogue in Capernaum for scripture readings, prayers and blessings. I watch Jesus come in with some of his disciples.. He notices this man with the withered hand and calls him forward, intending to cure him. But first he looks around and challenges the Pharisees present who are watching him intently. He wrong-foots them – no matter how they answer, they are in the wrong. Technically, healing is work and so forbidden on the Sabbath. So they remain silent, but inwardly furious. I resonate with Jesus’ anger at their hard-heartedness. I watch as he heals the man’s outstretched hand, admiring his compassion and resolute courage.
    • Such conflicts as this are typical of the grounds on which eventually the religious and secular authorities combined to destroy Jesus. They fail, or refuse, to recognise that Jesus is God’s agent, free with regard to law and custom.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, when you celebrated the Lord's day by healing, the Pharisees responding by plotting to kill you. You were stressing that God does not want to make our lives more difficult, and does not impose arbitrary rules on us. The great commandment is the law of love. Would people who know me be able to say that I follow the 'law of love'?
    • The man in question had a withered hand but a heart open to faith; the others had good health but closed and hard hearts. Hardness of heart makes Jesus angry – the unwillingness to see and feel the pain of another. Hardness of heart confines religion to rules and regulations, and obsessions with the Sabbath. The rule of the Sabbath took precedence over the terrible illness of another. Jesus’ anger gave him an energy to be compassionate and to cure.  Bring anger and obsession to prayer and allow Jesus touch what can be the hardness of heart in ourselves that makes us hard on others.
    • What is your withered hand? The bit of yourself you don't want God to know about? God knows and wants you to bring that out into the middle of your relationship. God offers healing, strength. Nothing in any of us is unknown to God; we are each totally loved.
    • Jesus' anger ‘got him going'. He did not focus it on himself. He was angry because of their hardness of heart towards the sick man. His anger came from his love and urgent desire to heal and to bring us into a real relationship with God. His anger flowed into compassion for the sick man and he was healed.
    • Good people often seem to provoke jealousy and even hostility in others. As I enter into the story in today's Gospel, I allow myself to become aware of how Jesus provoked opposition and hostility. Are there any parallels in my own life?
    • Jesus was being watched to see what he might do, yet it did not stop him from doing good, from bringing life. I ask God for the courage I need to do what I know to be the right thing.
    • The anger of Jesus is passion for life. I let myself imagine how Jesus wants to brush away whatever it is that holds me back from living fully as he calls me to life. For my part I ask for the strength I need to stretch out whatever ails me for healing.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, when you celebrated the Lord's day by healing, the Pharisees responding by plotting to kill you. You were stressing that God does not want to make our lives more difficult, and does not impose arbitrary rules on us. The great commandment is the law of love. Would people who know me be able to say that I follow the 'law of love'?
    • The man in question had a withered hand but a heart open to faith; the others had good health but closed and hard hearts. Hardness of heart makes Jesus angry – the unwillingness to see and feel the pain of another. Hardness of heart confines religion to rules and regulations, and obsessions with the Sabbath. The rule of the Sabbath took precedence over the terrible illness of another. Jesus’ anger gave him an energy to be compassionate and to cure.  Bring anger and obsession to prayer and allow Jesus touch what can be the hardness of heart in ourselves that makes us hard on others.
    • What is your withered hand? The bit of yourself you don't want God to know about? God knows and wants you to bring that out into the middle of your relationship. God offers healing, strength. Nothing in any of us is unknown to God; we are each totally loved.
    • Jesus' anger ‘got him going'. He did not focus it on himself. He was angry because of their hardness of heart towards the sick man. His anger came from his love and urgent desire to heal and to bring us into a real relationship with God. His anger flowed into compassion for the sick man and he was healed.
    • Good people often seem to provoke jealousy and even hostility in others. As I enter into the story in today's Gospel, I allow myself to become aware of how Jesus provoked opposition and hostility. Are there any parallels in my own life?
    • Jesus was being watched to see what he might do, yet it did not stop him from doing good, from bringing life. I ask God for the courage I need to do what I know to be the right thing.
    • The anger of Jesus is passion for life. I let myself imagine how Jesus wants to brush away whatever it is that holds me back from living fully as he calls me to life. For my part I ask for the strength I need to stretch out whatever ails me for healing.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, when you celebrated the Lord's day by healing, the Pharisees responding by plotting to kill you. You were stressing that God does not want to make our lives more difficult, and does not impose arbitrary rules on us. The great commandment is the law of love. Would people who know me be able to say that I follow the 'law of love'?
    • The man in question had a withered hand but a heart open to faith; the others had good health but closed and hard hearts. Hardness of heart makes Jesus angry – the unwillingness to see and feel the pain of another. Hardness of heart confines religion to rules and regulations, and obsessions with the Sabbath. The rule of the Sabbath took precedence over the terrible illness of another. Jesus’ anger gave him an energy to be compassionate and to cure.  Bring anger and obsession to prayer and allow Jesus touch what can be the hardness of heart in ourselves that makes us hard on others.
    • What is your withered hand? The bit of yourself you don't want God to know about? God knows and wants you to bring that out into the middle of your relationship. God offers healing, strength. Nothing in any of us is unknown to God; we are each totally loved.
    • Jesus' anger ‘got him going'. He did not focus it on himself. He was angry because of their hardness of heart towards the sick man. His anger came from his love and urgent desire to heal and to bring us into a real relationship with God. His anger flowed into compassion for the sick man and he was healed.
    • Good people often seem to provoke jealousy and even hostility in others. As I enter into the story in today's Gospel, I allow myself to become aware of how Jesus provoked opposition and hostility. Are there any parallels in my own life?
    • Jesus was being watched to see what he might do, yet it did not stop him from doing good, from bringing life. I ask God for the courage I need to do what I know to be the right thing.
    • The anger of Jesus is passion for life. I let myself imagine how Jesus wants to brush away whatever it is that holds me back from living fully as he calls me to life. For my part I ask for the strength I need to stretch out whatever ails me for healing.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, when you celebrated the Lord's day by healing, the Pharisees responding by plotting to kill you. You were stressing that God does not want to make our lives more difficult, and does not impose arbitrary rules on us. The great commandment is the law of love. Would people who know me be able to say that I follow the 'law of love'?
    • The man in question had a withered hand but a heart open to faith; the others had good health but closed and hard hearts. Hardness of heart makes Jesus angry – the unwillingness to see and feel the pain of another. Hardness of heart confines religion to rules and regulations, and obsessions with the Sabbath. The rule of the Sabbath took precedence over the terrible illness of another. Jesus’ anger gave him an energy to be compassionate and to cure.  Bring anger and obsession to prayer and allow Jesus touch what can be the hardness of heart in ourselves that makes us hard on others.
    • What is your withered hand? The bit of yourself you don't want God to know about? God knows and wants you to bring that out into the middle of your relationship. God offers healing, strength. Nothing in any of us is unknown to God; we are each totally loved.
    • Jesus' anger ‘got him going'. He did not focus it on himself. He was angry because of their hardness of heart towards the sick man. His anger came from his love and urgent desire to heal and to bring us into a real relationship with God. His anger flowed into compassion for the sick man and he was healed.
    • Good people often seem to provoke jealousy and even hostility in others. As I enter into the story in today's Gospel, I allow myself to become aware of how Jesus provoked opposition and hostility. Are there any parallels in my own life?
    • Jesus was being watched to see what he might do, yet it did not stop him from doing good, from bringing life. I ask God for the courage I need to do what I know to be the right thing.
    • The anger of Jesus is passion for life. I let myself imagine how Jesus wants to brush away whatever it is that holds me back from living fully as he calls me to life. For my part I ask for the strength I need to stretch out whatever ails me for healing.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, when you celebrated the Lord's day by healing, the Pharisees responding by plotting to kill you. You were stressing that God does not want to make our lives more difficult, and does not impose arbitrary rules on us. The great commandment is the law of love. Would people who know me be able to say that I follow the 'law of love'?
    • The man in question had a withered hand but a heart open to faith; the others had good health but closed and hard hearts. Hardness of heart makes Jesus angry – the unwillingness to see and feel the pain of another. Hardness of heart confines religion to rules and regulations, and obsessions with the Sabbath. The rule of the Sabbath took precedence over the terrible illness of another. Jesus’ anger gave him an energy to be compassionate and to cure.  Bring anger and obsession to prayer and allow Jesus touch what can be the hardness of heart in ourselves that makes us hard on others.
    • What is your withered hand? The bit of yourself you don't want God to know about? God knows and wants you to bring that out into the middle of your relationship. God offers healing, strength. Nothing in any of us is unknown to God; we are each totally loved.
    • Jesus' anger ‘got him going'. He did not focus it on himself. He was angry because of their hardness of heart towards the sick man. His anger came from his love and urgent desire to heal and to bring us into a real relationship with God. His anger flowed into compassion for the sick man and he was healed.
    • Good people often seem to provoke jealousy and even hostility in others. As I enter into the story in today's Gospel, I allow myself to become aware of how Jesus provoked opposition and hostility. Are there any parallels in my own life?
    • Jesus was being watched to see what he might do, yet it did not stop him from doing good, from bringing life. I ask God for the courage I need to do what I know to be the right thing.
    • The anger of Jesus is passion for life. I let myself imagine how Jesus wants to brush away whatever it is that holds me back from living fully as he calls me to life. For my part I ask for the strength I need to stretch out whatever ails me for healing.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Lord, when you celebrated the Lord's day by healing, the Pharisees responding by plotting to kill you. You were stressing that God does not want to make our lives more difficult, and does not impose arbitrary rules on us. The great commandment is the law of love. Would people who know me be able to say that I follow the 'law of love'?
    • The man in question had a withered hand but a heart open to faith; the others had good health but closed and hard hearts. Hardness of heart makes Jesus angry – the unwillingness to see and feel the pain of another. Hardness of heart confines religion to rules and regulations, and obsessions with the Sabbath. The rule of the Sabbath took precedence over the terrible illness of another. Jesus’ anger gave him an energy to be compassionate and to cure.  Bring anger and obsession to prayer and allow Jesus touch what can be the hardness of heart in ourselves that makes us hard on others.
    • What is your withered hand? The bit of yourself you don't want God to know about? God knows and wants you to bring that out into the middle of your relationship. God offers healing, strength. Nothing in any of us is unknown to God; we are each totally loved.
    • Jesus' anger ‘got him going'. He did not focus it on himself. He was angry because of their hardness of heart towards the sick man. His anger came from his love and urgent desire to heal and to bring us into a real relationship with God. His anger flowed into compassion for the sick man and he was healed.
    • Good people often seem to provoke jealousy and even hostility in others. As I enter into the story in today's Gospel, I allow myself to become aware of how Jesus provoked opposition and hostility. Are there any parallels in my own life?
    • Jesus was being watched to see what he might do, yet it did not stop him from doing good, from bringing life. I ask God for the courage I need to do what I know to be the right thing.
    • The anger of Jesus is passion for life. I let myself imagine how Jesus wants to brush away whatever it is that holds me back from living fully as he calls me to life. For my part I ask for the strength I need to stretch out whatever ails me for healing.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It’s the Sabbath and we are gathered at the synagogue in Capernaum for scripture readings, prayers and blessings. I watch Jesus come in. He notices the man with the withered hand and calls him forward. But first he looks around and challenges the Pharisees present who are watching him intently. He wrong-foots them – no matter how they answer they are in the wrong. So they remain silent, but inwardly furious. Technically, healing is work and forbidden on the Sabbath. On the other hand, the Jewish Sabbath is a day of rest and refreshment, not of bitterness and conflict. They fail, or refuse, to recognise that Jesus is God’s agent, free with regard to law and custom. I watch as Jesus heals the man’s outstretched hand, admiring his compassion and resolute courage.