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Mark 2:23-28

The Word of God

One sabbath Jesus was going through the grainfields; and as they made their way his disciples began to pluck heads of grain. The Pharisees said to him, "Look, why are they doing what is not lawful on the sabbath?" And he said to them, "Have you never read what David did when he and his companions were hungry and in need of food? He entered the house of God, when Abiathar was high priest, and ate the bread of the Presence, which it is not lawful for any but the priests to eat, and he gave some to his companions." Then he said to them, "The sabbath was made for humankind, and not humankind for the sabbath; so the Son of Man is lord even of the sabbath."

Mark 2:23-28
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Jesus tells us that all laws are for people and not vice versa. Often it is possible to lead a rule-centred Christian life rather than a love and people-centred one.
    • Our faith is a law of love - to love God and love one another. All our actions and behaviours should be measured by this law of love.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Jesus is introducing a new world order, one in which care for the needs of humankind is to be the top priority. Such compassion must always be at the heart of my choices. Pope Francis uses the term ‘gradualism’ to describe how many people are doing the best they can at a given time, and hope to do a little better later on. But today many Christians are shocked by this, just as the Pharisees were upset at the disciples breaking the sabbath regulations. Have I something to learn here--to live and let live, to live by love rather than by laws?
    • I ask him to teach me limitless compassion for those who have not yet reached their goal. And ask to see that I too have not yet reached my goal, and that that is OK in his eyes!
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • An attractive scene for our contemplation today! I visualise Jesus and his disciples taking a quiet Sabbath walk through sunny fields ripe with corn. I join the happy group and catch up with Jesus for a personal chat. He is delighted to see me and shares some grains with me that he has plucked himself. What do we talk about?
    • David was excused from the Law, as any man would have been by the circumstances of his extreme hunger. The Pharisees too would have acknowledged this, but to pick grains was seen as a form of work and to do so on the Sabbath, as the Pharisees insisted, was strictly forbidden. Jesus reminds them that laws are meant to be for man’s benefit.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • An attractive scene for my contemplation today: I visualise Jesus and his disciples taking a quiet Sabbath walk through sunny fields ripe with corn. I join the happy group and catch up with Jesus for a personal chat. He is delighted to see me and shares some grains with me that he had plucked himself. How do I respond?
    • David was excused from the Law as any man would have been by the circumstances of his extreme hunger. The Pharisees would have acknowledged this, but to pick grains was seen as a form of work and as such strictly forbidden on the Sabbath.
    • Jesus reminds them that laws are meant to be fair and framed for our benefit.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • /The Sabbath was made for man./ Whenever blind authoritarianism confronts common sense, this word of Jesus holds us. It is not easy to apply, and the Pharisees thought it revolutionary. They had extended the two great commandments: /Love God and love your neighbour,/ into 612 regulations, a spider’s web of constraints that stunted the spirit.
    • Lord, you speak freedom to my spirit. You do not call me to a soft or uncontrolled existence, but to the law of love, which should suffuse my life.
    • The original meaning of a Sabbath was for refreshment of mind and soul, for enjoying creation as God rested on the seventh day. It had become surrounded with rules and small regulations. Jesus' proposal that the meaning of the Sabbath was for our total benefit was new and off-putting to many religious people. His view of the Sabbath is the view of the one who comes to bring life to the full. Does my religion bring life to myself and to others? Give thanks in prayer when it does. Ask for help, compassion and a balance in life where my view of religion imposes burdens on others.
    • For many people religion is about what we do, rules to be kept, rituals observed. But they may be empty. If our rituals are empty, our hearts may be empty of God too. The Sabbath was bound in by laws. Jesus revolutionises the way we relate to God: the focus shifts from who we are rather than being on what we do. 
    • Be content to relax into the mystery of being loved. Goodness will flow from that realisation and practice.
    • The Pharisees object to what Jesus' disciples are doing on the Sabbath. Jesus replies with an extraordinarily radical statement, "The Sabbath was made for humankind and not humankind for the Sabbath; so the Son of Man (Jesus) is Lord even of the Sabbath." Jesus' saying is not in opposition to Jewish teaching but a reminder of God's original purpose which recognized serious human needs as good reasons for sometimes setting aside Sabbath regulations.
    • By claiming that he is ‘Lord even of the Sabbath', Jesus is claiming divine authority.
    • The Pharisees were skillful at pointing out deficiencies in others. Before God I review my thoughts and words to take care but I do not measure the world by my own small scale.
    • Jesus calls me to live in responsible freedom, being neither slavish nor careless. As I ask God to guide me, I give thanks as I realise that I am already guided by God.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • /The Sabbath was made for man./ Whenever blind authoritarianism confronts common sense, this word of Jesus holds us. It is not easy to apply, and the Pharisees thought it revolutionary. They had extended the two great commandments: /Love God and love your neighbour,/ into 612 regulations, a spider’s web of constraints that stunted the spirit.
    • Lord, you speak freedom to my spirit. You do not call me to a soft or uncontrolled existence, but to the law of love, which should suffuse my life.
    • The original meaning of a Sabbath was for refreshment of mind and soul, for enjoying creation as God rested on the seventh day. It had become surrounded with rules and small regulations. Jesus' proposal that the meaning of the Sabbath was for our total benefit was new and off-putting to many religious people. His view of the Sabbath is the view of the one who comes to bring life to the full. Does my religion bring life to myself and to others? Give thanks in prayer when it does. Ask for help, compassion and a balance in life where my view of religion imposes burdens on others.
    • For many people religion is about what we do, rules to be kept, rituals observed. But they may be empty. If our rituals are empty, our hearts may be empty of God too. The Sabbath was bound in by laws. Jesus revolutionises the way we relate to God: the focus shifts from who we are rather than being on what we do. 
    • Be content to relax into the mystery of being loved. Goodness will flow from that realisation and practice.
    • The Pharisees object to what Jesus' disciples are doing on the Sabbath. Jesus replies with an extraordinarily radical statement, "The Sabbath was made for humankind and not humankind for the Sabbath; so the Son of Man (Jesus) is Lord even of the Sabbath." Jesus' saying is not in opposition to Jewish teaching but a reminder of God's original purpose which recognized serious human needs as good reasons for sometimes setting aside Sabbath regulations.
    • By claiming that he is ‘Lord even of the Sabbath', Jesus is claiming divine authority.
    • The Pharisees were skillful at pointing out deficiencies in others. Before God I review my thoughts and words to take care but I do not measure the world by my own small scale.
    • Jesus calls me to live in responsible freedom, being neither slavish nor careless. As I ask God to guide me, I give thanks as I realise that I am already guided by God.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • /The Sabbath was made for man./ Whenever blind authoritarianism confronts common sense, this word of Jesus holds us. It is not easy to apply, and the Pharisees thought it revolutionary. They had extended the two great commandments: /Love God and love your neighbour,/ into 612 regulations, a spider’s web of constraints that stunted the spirit.
    • Lord, you speak freedom to my spirit. You do not call me to a soft or uncontrolled existence, but to the law of love, which should suffuse my life.
    • The original meaning of a Sabbath was for refreshment of mind and soul, for enjoying creation as God rested on the seventh day. It had become surrounded with rules and small regulations. Jesus' proposal that the meaning of the Sabbath was for our total benefit was new and off-putting to many religious people. His view of the Sabbath is the view of the one who comes to bring life to the full. Does my religion bring life to myself and to others? Give thanks in prayer when it does. Ask for help, compassion and a balance in life where my view of religion imposes burdens on others.
    • For many people religion is about what we do, rules to be kept, rituals observed. But they may be empty. If our rituals are empty, our hearts may be empty of God too. The Sabbath was bound in by laws. Jesus revolutionises the way we relate to God: the focus shifts from who we are rather than being on what we do. 
    • Be content to relax into the mystery of being loved. Goodness will flow from that realisation and practice.
    • The Pharisees object to what Jesus' disciples are doing on the Sabbath. Jesus replies with an extraordinarily radical statement, "The Sabbath was made for humankind and not humankind for the Sabbath; so the Son of Man (Jesus) is Lord even of the Sabbath." Jesus' saying is not in opposition to Jewish teaching but a reminder of God's original purpose which recognized serious human needs as good reasons for sometimes setting aside Sabbath regulations.
    • By claiming that he is ‘Lord even of the Sabbath', Jesus is claiming divine authority.
    • The Pharisees were skillful at pointing out deficiencies in others. Before God I review my thoughts and words to take care but I do not measure the world by my own small scale.
    • Jesus calls me to live in responsible freedom, being neither slavish nor careless. As I ask God to guide me, I give thanks as I realise that I am already guided by God.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • /The Sabbath was made for man./ Whenever blind authoritarianism confronts common sense, this word of Jesus holds us. It is not easy to apply, and the Pharisees thought it revolutionary. They had extended the two great commandments: /Love God and love your neighbour,/ into 612 regulations, a spider’s web of constraints that stunted the spirit.
    • Lord, you speak freedom to my spirit. You do not call me to a soft or uncontrolled existence, but to the law of love, which should suffuse my life.
    • The original meaning of a Sabbath was for refreshment of mind and soul, for enjoying creation as God rested on the seventh day. It had become surrounded with rules and small regulations. Jesus' proposal that the meaning of the Sabbath was for our total benefit was new and off-putting to many religious people. His view of the Sabbath is the view of the one who comes to bring life to the full. Does my religion bring life to myself and to others? Give thanks in prayer when it does. Ask for help, compassion and a balance in life where my view of religion imposes burdens on others.
    • For many people religion is about what we do, rules to be kept, rituals observed. But they may be empty. If our rituals are empty, our hearts may be empty of God too. The Sabbath was bound in by laws. Jesus revolutionises the way we relate to God: the focus shifts from who we are rather than being on what we do. 
    • Be content to relax into the mystery of being loved. Goodness will flow from that realisation and practice.
    • The Pharisees object to what Jesus' disciples are doing on the Sabbath. Jesus replies with an extraordinarily radical statement, "The Sabbath was made for humankind and not humankind for the Sabbath; so the Son of Man (Jesus) is Lord even of the Sabbath." Jesus' saying is not in opposition to Jewish teaching but a reminder of God's original purpose which recognized serious human needs as good reasons for sometimes setting aside Sabbath regulations.
    • By claiming that he is ‘Lord even of the Sabbath', Jesus is claiming divine authority.
    • The Pharisees were skillful at pointing out deficiencies in others. Before God I review my thoughts and words to take care but I do not measure the world by my own small scale.
    • Jesus calls me to live in responsible freedom, being neither slavish nor careless. As I ask God to guide me, I give thanks as I realise that I am already guided by God.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • /The Sabbath was made for man./ Whenever blind authoritarianism confronts common sense, this word of Jesus holds us. It is not easy to apply, and the Pharisees thought it revolutionary. They had extended the two great commandments: /Love God and love your neighbour,/ into 612 regulations, a spider’s web of constraints that stunted the spirit.
    • Lord, you speak freedom to my spirit. You do not call me to a soft or uncontrolled existence, but to the law of love, which should suffuse my life.
    • The original meaning of a Sabbath was for refreshment of mind and soul, for enjoying creation as God rested on the seventh day. It had become surrounded with rules and small regulations. Jesus' proposal that the meaning of the Sabbath was for our total benefit was new and off-putting to many religious people. His view of the Sabbath is the view of the one who comes to bring life to the full. Does my religion bring life to myself and to others? Give thanks in prayer when it does. Ask for help, compassion and a balance in life where my view of religion imposes burdens on others.
    • For many people religion is about what we do, rules to be kept, rituals observed. But they may be empty. If our rituals are empty, our hearts may be empty of God too. The Sabbath was bound in by laws. Jesus revolutionises the way we relate to God: the focus shifts from who we are rather than being on what we do. 
    • Be content to relax into the mystery of being loved. Goodness will flow from that realisation and practice.
    • The Pharisees object to what Jesus' disciples are doing on the Sabbath. Jesus replies with an extraordinarily radical statement, "The Sabbath was made for humankind and not humankind for the Sabbath; so the Son of Man (Jesus) is Lord even of the Sabbath." Jesus' saying is not in opposition to Jewish teaching but a reminder of God's original purpose which recognized serious human needs as good reasons for sometimes setting aside Sabbath regulations.
    • By claiming that he is ‘Lord even of the Sabbath', Jesus is claiming divine authority.
    • The Pharisees were skillful at pointing out deficiencies in others. Before God I review my thoughts and words to take care but I do not measure the world by my own small scale.
    • Jesus calls me to live in responsible freedom, being neither slavish nor careless. As I ask God to guide me, I give thanks as I realise that I am already guided by God.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • /The Sabbath was made for man./ Whenever blind authoritarianism confronts common sense, this word of Jesus holds us. It is not easy to apply, and the Pharisees thought it revolutionary. They had extended the two great commandments: /Love God and love your neighbour,/ into 612 regulations, a spider’s web of constraints that stunted the spirit.
    • Lord, you speak freedom to my spirit. You do not call me to a soft or uncontrolled existence, but to the law of love, which should suffuse my life.
    • The original meaning of a Sabbath was for refreshment of mind and soul, for enjoying creation as God rested on the seventh day. It had become surrounded with rules and small regulations. Jesus' proposal that the meaning of the Sabbath was for our total benefit was new and off-putting to many religious people. His view of the Sabbath is the view of the one who comes to bring life to the full. Does my religion bring life to myself and to others? Give thanks in prayer when it does. Ask for help, compassion and a balance in life where my view of religion imposes burdens on others.
    • For many people religion is about what we do, rules to be kept, rituals observed. But they may be empty. If our rituals are empty, our hearts may be empty of God too. The Sabbath was bound in by laws. Jesus revolutionises the way we relate to God: the focus shifts from who we are rather than being on what we do. 
    • Be content to relax into the mystery of being loved. Goodness will flow from that realisation and practice.
    • The Pharisees object to what Jesus' disciples are doing on the Sabbath. Jesus replies with an extraordinarily radical statement, "The Sabbath was made for humankind and not humankind for the Sabbath; so the Son of Man (Jesus) is Lord even of the Sabbath." Jesus' saying is not in opposition to Jewish teaching but a reminder of God's original purpose which recognized serious human needs as good reasons for sometimes setting aside Sabbath regulations.
    • By claiming that he is ‘Lord even of the Sabbath', Jesus is claiming divine authority.
    • The Pharisees were skillful at pointing out deficiencies in others. Before God I review my thoughts and words to take care but I do not measure the world by my own small scale.
    • Jesus calls me to live in responsible freedom, being neither slavish nor careless. As I ask God to guide me, I give thanks as I realise that I am already guided by God.