User Settings

Matthew 26:14-25

The Word of God

Then one of the twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests and said, "What will you give me if I betray him to you?" They paid him thirty pieces of silver. And from that moment he began to look for an opportunity to betray him. On the first day of Unleavened Bread the disciples came to Jesus, saying, "Where do you want us to make the preparations for you to eat the Passover?" He said, "Go into the city to a certain man, and say to him, 'The Teacher says, My time is near; I will keep the Passover at your house with my disciples.'" So the disciples did as Jesus had directed them, and they prepared the Passover meal. When it was evening, he took his place with the twelve; and while they were eating, he said, "Truly I tell you, one of you will betray me." And they became greatly distressed and began to say to him one after another, "Surely not I, Lord?" He answered, "The one who has dipped his hand into the bowl with me will betray me. The Son of Man goes as it is written of him, but woe to that one by whom the Son of Man is betrayed! It would have been better for that one not to have been born." Judas, who betrayed him, said, "Surely not I, Rabbi?" He replied, "You have said so."

Matthew 26:14-25
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Look at Judas and watch him – fearfully betraying Jesus. Look at Jesus as his heart goes out to the weakness of disciples. In all sorts of weakness in our lives, the love of God is triumphant. Let him be the strength in your weakness and sinfulness.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Is Judas motivated by anger and disappointment? Had he a different vision of the messianic kingdom than Jesus? Did he resent that Jesus saw through him when he protested at the waste of Mary’s costly ointment at the feast? One thing is clear: he refused to accept Jesus as he was. Like us, he didn’t see that it is we, not God, who must change.
    • The real sin of Judas was not his betrayal; it was rather his rejection of the light. Judas refused to believe in the possibility of forgiveness. Let us not imitate him. No matter what wrong we have done we can turn to Jesus for forgiveness and healing.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It is said that each of us has our ‘price’. Judas was content to betray Jesus for the price of a slave. But our ‘price’ needn’t be in hard cash. It could be our career, success, popularity, comfort, learning and many other things. For what might I betray my Lord?
    • We tend to think of Jesus’ friends as only those who are named in the Gospels or who travel with him. But he had many other friends, like the unnamed man who made him so welcome for the Passover Feast. The same is true to-day. Jesus has many unlikely friends in many unlikely places. We in the Sacred Space community are among them!
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It is Spy Wednesday - poor Judas, for ever remembered as the betrayer. His greatest mistake was not that he betrayed Jesus, but that he had no confidence in the Lord's mercy and in his own power to recover from that betrayal, as Peter did.
    • Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in you, no matter what I have done.
    • ‘See how the divinity hides itself’ is a suggestion of Saint Ignatius in praying over the passion of Jesus. There is dignity but little divinity obvious at the last supper. The weakness of humanity in body will be the focus of much of the next few hours in the life of Jesus. Pain, torture, indignity and death await him. Prayer these days enters into the suffering of Jesus, and with Jesus into his suffering today in his people, especially in pain, torture, indignity and death inflicted by others.
    • ‘Thirty pieces of silver' has been a negative phrase ever since. It's a way of saying a person was cheated or betrayed. Jesus suffered this much in his passion. Our prayer can be simply to be with him in his suffering, trying to feel as he felt, to think as he thought. We are invited in our prayer in the Passion to see how the divinity hides itself. The man of suffering is the God who still suffers the pain, injustices, greed and betrayal of his people today. God is not impervious to our suffering.
    • I ask for compassion for all who, like Judas, have been brought to a point of denial. I linger on the response of Jesus during these days of his trial.
    • Aware of my own fragility, I ask Jesus for the strength that I need to give witness to his spirit in difficult moments.
    • The disciples had come a long journey to bring them to this point. Now, the depth of their discipleship would be challenged. I consider the journey I have travelled to arrive, with Jesus at my side, at this Sunday before Holy Week. I receive strength as Jesus shares himself with me; I ask that I may stand by him in the difficult moments too.
    • I think of the characters in the gospel story and see where I can recognise myself among them: some profess their faith; some do as they are asked; some do simply what others do; some disappear in the moment of crisis.
    • Demonstrations, mobs, movements and crowds bring energy and life but they do not teach me about discipleship. The exuberance and welcome that Jesus received and entering Jerusalem was short-lived; those who would stand by him would be few. I think of how I can be carried along by popular movements, forgetting where my true value lies.
    • Thirty pieces of silver was a high price; Jesus has often been betrayed for less. The deal does not always involve money; the currencies of comfort, popularity, influence and power are often acceptable forms of payment.
    • Although he saw that he might be betrayed, Jesus did not turn from the disciples or from giving himself to them. He did not let their distress silence him but spoke the truth to them, knowing it would be unwelcome.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It is Spy Wednesday - poor Judas, for ever remembered as the betrayer. His greatest mistake was not that he betrayed Jesus, but that he had no confidence in the Lord's mercy and in his own power to recover from that betrayal, as Peter did.
    • Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in you, no matter what I have done.
    • ‘See how the divinity hides itself’ is a suggestion of Saint Ignatius in praying over the passion of Jesus. There is dignity but little divinity obvious at the last supper. The weakness of humanity in body will be the focus of much of the next few hours in the life of Jesus. Pain, torture, indignity and death await him. Prayer these days enters into the suffering of Jesus, and with Jesus into his suffering today in his people, especially in pain, torture, indignity and death inflicted by others.
    • ‘Thirty pieces of silver' has been a negative phrase ever since. It's a way of saying a person was cheated or betrayed. Jesus suffered this much in his passion. Our prayer can be simply to be with him in his suffering, trying to feel as he felt, to think as he thought. We are invited in our prayer in the Passion to see how the divinity hides itself. The man of suffering is the God who still suffers the pain, injustices, greed and betrayal of his people today. God is not impervious to our suffering.
    • I ask for compassion for all who, like Judas, have been brought to a point of denial. I linger on the response of Jesus during these days of his trial.
    • Aware of my own fragility, I ask Jesus for the strength that I need to give witness to his spirit in difficult moments.
    • The disciples had come a long journey to bring them to this point. Now, the depth of their discipleship would be challenged. I consider the journey I have travelled to arrive, with Jesus at my side, at this Sunday before Holy Week. I receive strength as Jesus shares himself with me; I ask that I may stand by him in the difficult moments too.
    • I think of the characters in the gospel story and see where I can recognise myself among them: some profess their faith; some do as they are asked; some do simply what others do; some disappear in the moment of crisis.
    • Demonstrations, mobs, movements and crowds bring energy and life but they do not teach me about discipleship. The exuberance and welcome that Jesus received and entering Jerusalem was short-lived; those who would stand by him would be few. I think of how I can be carried along by popular movements, forgetting where my true value lies.
    • Thirty pieces of silver was a high price; Jesus has often been betrayed for less. The deal does not always involve money; the currencies of comfort, popularity, influence and power are often acceptable forms of payment.
    • Although he saw that he might be betrayed, Jesus did not turn from the disciples or from giving himself to them. He did not let their distress silence him but spoke the truth to them, knowing it would be unwelcome.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It is Spy Wednesday - poor Judas, for ever remembered as the betrayer. His greatest mistake was not that he betrayed Jesus, but that he had no confidence in the Lord's mercy and in his own power to recover from that betrayal, as Peter did.
    • Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in you, no matter what I have done.
    • ‘See how the divinity hides itself’ is a suggestion of Saint Ignatius in praying over the passion of Jesus. There is dignity but little divinity obvious at the last supper. The weakness of humanity in body will be the focus of much of the next few hours in the life of Jesus. Pain, torture, indignity and death await him. Prayer these days enters into the suffering of Jesus, and with Jesus into his suffering today in his people, especially in pain, torture, indignity and death inflicted by others.
    • ‘Thirty pieces of silver' has been a negative phrase ever since. It's a way of saying a person was cheated or betrayed. Jesus suffered this much in his passion. Our prayer can be simply to be with him in his suffering, trying to feel as he felt, to think as he thought. We are invited in our prayer in the Passion to see how the divinity hides itself. The man of suffering is the God who still suffers the pain, injustices, greed and betrayal of his people today. God is not impervious to our suffering.
    • I ask for compassion for all who, like Judas, have been brought to a point of denial. I linger on the response of Jesus during these days of his trial.
    • Aware of my own fragility, I ask Jesus for the strength that I need to give witness to his spirit in difficult moments.
    • The disciples had come a long journey to bring them to this point. Now, the depth of their discipleship would be challenged. I consider the journey I have travelled to arrive, with Jesus at my side, at this Sunday before Holy Week. I receive strength as Jesus shares himself with me; I ask that I may stand by him in the difficult moments too.
    • I think of the characters in the gospel story and see where I can recognise myself among them: some profess their faith; some do as they are asked; some do simply what others do; some disappear in the moment of crisis.
    • Demonstrations, mobs, movements and crowds bring energy and life but they do not teach me about discipleship. The exuberance and welcome that Jesus received and entering Jerusalem was short-lived; those who would stand by him would be few. I think of how I can be carried along by popular movements, forgetting where my true value lies.
    • Thirty pieces of silver was a high price; Jesus has often been betrayed for less. The deal does not always involve money; the currencies of comfort, popularity, influence and power are often acceptable forms of payment.
    • Although he saw that he might be betrayed, Jesus did not turn from the disciples or from giving himself to them. He did not let their distress silence him but spoke the truth to them, knowing it would be unwelcome.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It is Spy Wednesday - poor Judas, for ever remembered as the betrayer. His greatest mistake was not that he betrayed Jesus, but that he had no confidence in the Lord's mercy and in his own power to recover from that betrayal, as Peter did.
    • Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in you, no matter what I have done.
    • ‘See how the divinity hides itself’ is a suggestion of Saint Ignatius in praying over the passion of Jesus. There is dignity but little divinity obvious at the last supper. The weakness of humanity in body will be the focus of much of the next few hours in the life of Jesus. Pain, torture, indignity and death await him. Prayer these days enters into the suffering of Jesus, and with Jesus into his suffering today in his people, especially in pain, torture, indignity and death inflicted by others.
    • ‘Thirty pieces of silver' has been a negative phrase ever since. It's a way of saying a person was cheated or betrayed. Jesus suffered this much in his passion. Our prayer can be simply to be with him in his suffering, trying to feel as he felt, to think as he thought. We are invited in our prayer in the Passion to see how the divinity hides itself. The man of suffering is the God who still suffers the pain, injustices, greed and betrayal of his people today. God is not impervious to our suffering.
    • I ask for compassion for all who, like Judas, have been brought to a point of denial. I linger on the response of Jesus during these days of his trial.
    • Aware of my own fragility, I ask Jesus for the strength that I need to give witness to his spirit in difficult moments.
    • The disciples had come a long journey to bring them to this point. Now, the depth of their discipleship would be challenged. I consider the journey I have travelled to arrive, with Jesus at my side, at this Sunday before Holy Week. I receive strength as Jesus shares himself with me; I ask that I may stand by him in the difficult moments too.
    • I think of the characters in the gospel story and see where I can recognise myself among them: some profess their faith; some do as they are asked; some do simply what others do; some disappear in the moment of crisis.
    • Demonstrations, mobs, movements and crowds bring energy and life but they do not teach me about discipleship. The exuberance and welcome that Jesus received and entering Jerusalem was short-lived; those who would stand by him would be few. I think of how I can be carried along by popular movements, forgetting where my true value lies.
    • Thirty pieces of silver was a high price; Jesus has often been betrayed for less. The deal does not always involve money; the currencies of comfort, popularity, influence and power are often acceptable forms of payment.
    • Although he saw that he might be betrayed, Jesus did not turn from the disciples or from giving himself to them. He did not let their distress silence him but spoke the truth to them, knowing it would be unwelcome.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It is Spy Wednesday - poor Judas, for ever remembered as the betrayer. His greatest mistake was not that he betrayed Jesus, but that he had no confidence in the Lord's mercy and in his own power to recover from that betrayal, as Peter did.
    • Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in you, no matter what I have done.
    • ‘See how the divinity hides itself’ is a suggestion of Saint Ignatius in praying over the passion of Jesus. There is dignity but little divinity obvious at the last supper. The weakness of humanity in body will be the focus of much of the next few hours in the life of Jesus. Pain, torture, indignity and death await him. Prayer these days enters into the suffering of Jesus, and with Jesus into his suffering today in his people, especially in pain, torture, indignity and death inflicted by others.
    • ‘Thirty pieces of silver' has been a negative phrase ever since. It's a way of saying a person was cheated or betrayed. Jesus suffered this much in his passion. Our prayer can be simply to be with him in his suffering, trying to feel as he felt, to think as he thought. We are invited in our prayer in the Passion to see how the divinity hides itself. The man of suffering is the God who still suffers the pain, injustices, greed and betrayal of his people today. God is not impervious to our suffering.
    • I ask for compassion for all who, like Judas, have been brought to a point of denial. I linger on the response of Jesus during these days of his trial.
    • Aware of my own fragility, I ask Jesus for the strength that I need to give witness to his spirit in difficult moments.
    • The disciples had come a long journey to bring them to this point. Now, the depth of their discipleship would be challenged. I consider the journey I have travelled to arrive, with Jesus at my side, at this Sunday before Holy Week. I receive strength as Jesus shares himself with me; I ask that I may stand by him in the difficult moments too.
    • I think of the characters in the gospel story and see where I can recognise myself among them: some profess their faith; some do as they are asked; some do simply what others do; some disappear in the moment of crisis.
    • Demonstrations, mobs, movements and crowds bring energy and life but they do not teach me about discipleship. The exuberance and welcome that Jesus received and entering Jerusalem was short-lived; those who would stand by him would be few. I think of how I can be carried along by popular movements, forgetting where my true value lies.
    • Thirty pieces of silver was a high price; Jesus has often been betrayed for less. The deal does not always involve money; the currencies of comfort, popularity, influence and power are often acceptable forms of payment.
    • Although he saw that he might be betrayed, Jesus did not turn from the disciples or from giving himself to them. He did not let their distress silence him but spoke the truth to them, knowing it would be unwelcome.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It is Spy Wednesday - poor Judas, for ever remembered as the betrayer. His greatest mistake was not that he betrayed Jesus, but that he had no confidence in the Lord's mercy and in his own power to recover from that betrayal, as Peter did.
    • Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in you, no matter what I have done.
    • ‘See how the divinity hides itself’ is a suggestion of Saint Ignatius in praying over the passion of Jesus. There is dignity but little divinity obvious at the last supper. The weakness of humanity in body will be the focus of much of the next few hours in the life of Jesus. Pain, torture, indignity and death await him. Prayer these days enters into the suffering of Jesus, and with Jesus into his suffering today in his people, especially in pain, torture, indignity and death inflicted by others.
    • ‘Thirty pieces of silver' has been a negative phrase ever since. It's a way of saying a person was cheated or betrayed. Jesus suffered this much in his passion. Our prayer can be simply to be with him in his suffering, trying to feel as he felt, to think as he thought. We are invited in our prayer in the Passion to see how the divinity hides itself. The man of suffering is the God who still suffers the pain, injustices, greed and betrayal of his people today. God is not impervious to our suffering.
    • I ask for compassion for all who, like Judas, have been brought to a point of denial. I linger on the response of Jesus during these days of his trial.
    • Aware of my own fragility, I ask Jesus for the strength that I need to give witness to his spirit in difficult moments.
    • The disciples had come a long journey to bring them to this point. Now, the depth of their discipleship would be challenged. I consider the journey I have travelled to arrive, with Jesus at my side, at this Sunday before Holy Week. I receive strength as Jesus shares himself with me; I ask that I may stand by him in the difficult moments too.
    • I think of the characters in the gospel story and see where I can recognise myself among them: some profess their faith; some do as they are asked; some do simply what others do; some disappear in the moment of crisis.
    • Demonstrations, mobs, movements and crowds bring energy and life but they do not teach me about discipleship. The exuberance and welcome that Jesus received and entering Jerusalem was short-lived; those who would stand by him would be few. I think of how I can be carried along by popular movements, forgetting where my true value lies.
    • Thirty pieces of silver was a high price; Jesus has often been betrayed for less. The deal does not always involve money; the currencies of comfort, popularity, influence and power are often acceptable forms of payment.
    • Although he saw that he might be betrayed, Jesus did not turn from the disciples or from giving himself to them. He did not let their distress silence him but spoke the truth to them, knowing it would be unwelcome.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It is Spy Wednesday - poor Judas, for ever remembered as the betrayer. His greatest mistake was not that he betrayed Jesus, but that he had no confidence in the Lord's mercy and in his own power to recover from that betrayal, as Peter did.
    • Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place my trust in you, no matter what I have done.
    • ‘See how the divinity hides itself’ is a suggestion of Saint Ignatius in praying over the passion of Jesus. There is dignity but little divinity obvious at the last supper. The weakness of humanity in body will be the focus of much of the next few hours in the life of Jesus. Pain, torture, indignity and death await him. Prayer these days enters into the suffering of Jesus, and with Jesus into his suffering today in his people, especially in pain, torture, indignity and death inflicted by others.
    • ‘Thirty pieces of silver' has been a negative phrase ever since. It's a way of saying a person was cheated or betrayed. Jesus suffered this much in his passion. Our prayer can be simply to be with him in his suffering, trying to feel as he felt, to think as he thought. We are invited in our prayer in the Passion to see how the divinity hides itself. The man of suffering is the God who still suffers the pain, injustices, greed and betrayal of his people today. God is not impervious to our suffering.
    • I ask for compassion for all who, like Judas, have been brought to a point of denial. I linger on the response of Jesus during these days of his trial.
    • Aware of my own fragility, I ask Jesus for the strength that I need to give witness to his spirit in difficult moments.
    • The disciples had come a long journey to bring them to this point. Now, the depth of their discipleship would be challenged. I consider the journey I have travelled to arrive, with Jesus at my side, at this Sunday before Holy Week. I receive strength as Jesus shares himself with me; I ask that I may stand by him in the difficult moments too.
    • I think of the characters in the gospel story and see where I can recognise myself among them: some profess their faith; some do as they are asked; some do simply what others do; some disappear in the moment of crisis.
    • Demonstrations, mobs, movements and crowds bring energy and life but they do not teach me about discipleship. The exuberance and welcome that Jesus received and entering Jerusalem was short-lived; those who would stand by him would be few. I think of how I can be carried along by popular movements, forgetting where my true value lies.
    • Thirty pieces of silver was a high price; Jesus has often been betrayed for less. The deal does not always involve money; the currencies of comfort, popularity, influence and power are often acceptable forms of payment.
    • Although he saw that he might be betrayed, Jesus did not turn from the disciples or from giving himself to them. He did not let their distress silence him but spoke the truth to them, knowing it would be unwelcome.