User Settings

Matthew 18:21-35

The Word of God

Then Peter came and said to him, "Lord, if another member of the church sins against me, how often should I forgive? As many as seven times?" Jesus said to him, "Not seven times, but, I tell you, seventy-seven times. "For this reason the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his slaves. When he began the reckoning, one who owed him ten thousand talents was brought to him; and, as he could not pay, his lord ordered him to be sold, together with his wife and children and all his possessions, and payment to be made. So the slave fell on his knees before him, saying, 'Have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.' And out of pity for him, the lord of that slave released him and forgave him the debt. But that same slave, as he went out, came upon one of his fellow slaves who owed him a hundred denarii; and seizing him by the throat, he said, 'Pay what you owe.' Then his fellow slave fell down and pleaded with him, 'Have patience with me, and I will pay you.' But he refused; then he went and threw him into prison until he would pay the debt. When his fellow slaves saw what had happened, they were greatly distressed, and they went and reported to their lord all that had taken place. Then his lord summoned him and said to him, 'You wicked slave! I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me. Should you not have had mercy on your fellow slave, as I had mercy on you?' And in anger his lord handed him over to be tortured until he would pay his entire debt. So my heavenly Father will also do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother or sister from your heart."

Matthew 18:21-35
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Forgiveness can be very hard. C.S. Lewis wrote: “Everyone says forgiveness is a lovely idea, until they have something to forgive”. But when I fail to forgive, I am shackled to the evil which has been done to me. I cannot move forward. How free am I, or am I tied to resentments?
    • If we must be prepared to forgive seventy-seven times, then we must also be ready to ask for forgiveness – and believe we are forgiven – seventy-seven times.” Does forgiveness flow back and forth in my dealings with others, or is it rare in my life?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Peter must have been shocked to know that the path of forgiveness knows no end. But later he is glad, because Jesus forgives him even though he denied his Master. He saw that if God never stops forgiving him he must try to forgive others. Only those who forgive belong in God’s kingdom.
    • Lord, to forgive from the heart is a grace I must pray for. I can’t do it on my own, and I know this. Often I am a ‘wicked slave’! You are always so good to me, but I can be so hard-hearted with those who offend me. Have mercy on me and change my heart!
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • The forgiveness that is given to us is for ourselves certainly, but when God is at work there is no purely private benefit as the effects spread widely.
    • What we receive from God, we are given freely. As I acknowledge that what is good in my life comes from God, I pray for the generosity I need to be a blessing to others.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Last year an Afghan warlord begged foreign donors to bring water to his desert land; then he entertained journalists in his palace, which boasted six swimming pools. Like the unforgiving creditor in the Gospel, he probably did not notice the inconsistency.
    • Lord, I show understanding and sympathy with my own desires, but apply different standards to others. In this parable you remind me to look hard at myself.
    • As you pray this familiar story - read it twice and see does anything new strike you the second time. A story of Jesus throws light on the person reading it and on the reality he speaks about; in this case, on the call to forgive and on the nature of God's forgiveness. The call is to forgive from the heart, not just with words. Pray the prayer he taught us - ‘forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us.'
    • This parable is about the mercy of God, which is one of the strongest divine qualities, if we may put it like that. Nothing except mercy born of compassion cancels a debt like the one referred to in the story. It further ends by calling us to be merciful as we have received mercy. Mercy is deeper than forgiveness; it sees into the heart of the other and walks around for a while in the others shoes. It includes compassion and active healing. Shakespeare's description still resounds, 'Mercy is twice bless'd - it blesseth him that gives and him that takes.' To live in an environment of mercy is to live in an atmosphere of peace, healing and growth.
    • As Jesus continues to emphasise forgiveness, I humbly bring myself before God who forgives me everything, who loves me beyond any sin. The forgiveness that God gives is often difficult for me to receive. I think of how it is given generously to me so that I may give it freely to others.
    • I pray for those who have caused me hurt and, even if I can't wish them well now, I pray that one day I might.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Last year an Afghan warlord begged foreign donors to bring water to his desert land; then he entertained journalists in his palace, which boasted six swimming pools. Like the unforgiving creditor in the Gospel, he probably did not notice the inconsistency.
    • Lord, I show understanding and sympathy with my own desires, but apply different standards to others. In this parable you remind me to look hard at myself.
    • As you pray this familiar story - read it twice and see does anything new strike you the second time. A story of Jesus throws light on the person reading it and on the reality he speaks about; in this case, on the call to forgive and on the nature of God's forgiveness. The call is to forgive from the heart, not just with words. Pray the prayer he taught us - ‘forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us.'
    • This parable is about the mercy of God, which is one of the strongest divine qualities, if we may put it like that. Nothing except mercy born of compassion cancels a debt like the one referred to in the story. It further ends by calling us to be merciful as we have received mercy. Mercy is deeper than forgiveness; it sees into the heart of the other and walks around for a while in the others shoes. It includes compassion and active healing. Shakespeare's description still resounds, 'Mercy is twice bless'd - it blesseth him that gives and him that takes.' To live in an environment of mercy is to live in an atmosphere of peace, healing and growth.
    • As Jesus continues to emphasise forgiveness, I humbly bring myself before God who forgives me everything, who loves me beyond any sin. The forgiveness that God gives is often difficult for me to receive. I think of how it is given generously to me so that I may give it freely to others.
    • I pray for those who have caused me hurt and, even if I can't wish them well now, I pray that one day I might.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Last year an Afghan warlord begged foreign donors to bring water to his desert land; then he entertained journalists in his palace, which boasted six swimming pools. Like the unforgiving creditor in the Gospel, he probably did not notice the inconsistency.
    • Lord, I show understanding and sympathy with my own desires, but apply different standards to others. In this parable you remind me to look hard at myself.
    • As you pray this familiar story - read it twice and see does anything new strike you the second time. A story of Jesus throws light on the person reading it and on the reality he speaks about; in this case, on the call to forgive and on the nature of God's forgiveness. The call is to forgive from the heart, not just with words. Pray the prayer he taught us - ‘forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us.'
    • This parable is about the mercy of God, which is one of the strongest divine qualities, if we may put it like that. Nothing except mercy born of compassion cancels a debt like the one referred to in the story. It further ends by calling us to be merciful as we have received mercy. Mercy is deeper than forgiveness; it sees into the heart of the other and walks around for a while in the others shoes. It includes compassion and active healing. Shakespeare's description still resounds, 'Mercy is twice bless'd - it blesseth him that gives and him that takes.' To live in an environment of mercy is to live in an atmosphere of peace, healing and growth.
    • As Jesus continues to emphasise forgiveness, I humbly bring myself before God who forgives me everything, who loves me beyond any sin. The forgiveness that God gives is often difficult for me to receive. I think of how it is given generously to me so that I may give it freely to others.
    • I pray for those who have caused me hurt and, even if I can't wish them well now, I pray that one day I might.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Last year an Afghan warlord begged foreign donors to bring water to his desert land; then he entertained journalists in his palace, which boasted six swimming pools. Like the unforgiving creditor in the Gospel, he probably did not notice the inconsistency.
    • Lord, I show understanding and sympathy with my own desires, but apply different standards to others. In this parable you remind me to look hard at myself.
    • As you pray this familiar story - read it twice and see does anything new strike you the second time. A story of Jesus throws light on the person reading it and on the reality he speaks about; in this case, on the call to forgive and on the nature of God's forgiveness. The call is to forgive from the heart, not just with words. Pray the prayer he taught us - ‘forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us.'
    • This parable is about the mercy of God, which is one of the strongest divine qualities, if we may put it like that. Nothing except mercy born of compassion cancels a debt like the one referred to in the story. It further ends by calling us to be merciful as we have received mercy. Mercy is deeper than forgiveness; it sees into the heart of the other and walks around for a while in the others shoes. It includes compassion and active healing. Shakespeare's description still resounds, 'Mercy is twice bless'd - it blesseth him that gives and him that takes.' To live in an environment of mercy is to live in an atmosphere of peace, healing and growth.
    • As Jesus continues to emphasise forgiveness, I humbly bring myself before God who forgives me everything, who loves me beyond any sin. The forgiveness that God gives is often difficult for me to receive. I think of how it is given generously to me so that I may give it freely to others.
    • I pray for those who have caused me hurt and, even if I can't wish them well now, I pray that one day I might.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Last year an Afghan warlord begged foreign donors to bring water to his desert land; then he entertained journalists in his palace, which boasted six swimming pools. Like the unforgiving creditor in the Gospel, he probably did not notice the inconsistency.
    • Lord, I show understanding and sympathy with my own desires, but apply different standards to others. In this parable you remind me to look hard at myself.
    • As you pray this familiar story - read it twice and see does anything new strike you the second time. A story of Jesus throws light on the person reading it and on the reality he speaks about; in this case, on the call to forgive and on the nature of God's forgiveness. The call is to forgive from the heart, not just with words. Pray the prayer he taught us - ‘forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us.'
    • This parable is about the mercy of God, which is one of the strongest divine qualities, if we may put it like that. Nothing except mercy born of compassion cancels a debt like the one referred to in the story. It further ends by calling us to be merciful as we have received mercy. Mercy is deeper than forgiveness; it sees into the heart of the other and walks around for a while in the others shoes. It includes compassion and active healing. Shakespeare's description still resounds, 'Mercy is twice bless'd - it blesseth him that gives and him that takes.' To live in an environment of mercy is to live in an atmosphere of peace, healing and growth.
    • As Jesus continues to emphasise forgiveness, I humbly bring myself before God who forgives me everything, who loves me beyond any sin. The forgiveness that God gives is often difficult for me to receive. I think of how it is given generously to me so that I may give it freely to others.
    • I pray for those who have caused me hurt and, even if I can't wish them well now, I pray that one day I might.