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Matthew 12:38-42

Then some of the scribes and Pharisees said to Jesus, "Teacher, we wish to see a sign from you." But he answered them, "An evil and adulterous generation asks for a sign, but no sign will be given to it except the sign of the prophet Jonah. For just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the sea monster, so for three days and three nights the Son of Man will be in the heart of the earth. The people of Nineveh will rise up at the judgment with this generation and condemn it, because they repented at the proclamation of Jonah, and see, something greater than Jonah is here! The queen of the South will rise up at the judgment with this generation and condemn it, because she came from the ends of the earth to listen to the wisdom of Solomon, and see, something greater than Solomon is here!"

Matthew 12:38-42
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Most of us are fascinated by spectacular events. This is why the scribes want ‘a sign’ from Jesus to prove that he possessed exceptional powers. But Jesus is not interested in superficial curiosity about himself. He is not a magician! Rather, he is God-among-them, mysterious and blessed.
    • How deep is my faith? Does it depend on dramatic things happening in answer to my prayer? Or do I simply and humbly place my faith and hope in the person of Jesus Christ, and unite my prayer with his? Can I simply say: ‘Your will be done’ (Matthew 6:10)?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Signs from God sometimes seem desirable – and even reasonable to expect. Jesus reminds me that, if I want them, I may be looking in the wrong direction. I pray that I may see and appreciate where God is already at work in the events and relationships of my life.
    • My prayertime can train the eye of my heart to recognise God at work in my life. As I become more familiar with and trusting in God’s Spirit, I need less proof and am able to rely on what I have learnt. God trusts me. I learn to trust God’s spirit in me.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • If I was a Pharisee and I met this wandering healer-prophet, perhaps I would ask for a sign too. Many Christians look for signs like miracles, voices from heaven, Mary's image on rose petals, bleeding stigmata. Jesus points us away from spectacular signs. It is our faith in the person of Jesus that keeps us going. He points these Jewish men to the faith and perceptiveness of women and gentiles.
    • The opponents are looking for divine signs from Jesus. Something as outlandish as the splendour of the queen, or the miracle of Jonah. Jesus slides away from these demands. His divine sings are the compassion and especially the forgiveness of God. He was criticised because only God could forgive sins, and he claimed to do so. For saying he was equal to God he would be killed.
    • When we hear of Jonah we remember he was a reluctant prophet and he was also the one who resisted the call of the Lord to speak to the Gentiles, to enter into the world of the other, the foreigner, the ones who are not like ourselves. Jesus was like that - the one whose heart and words, love and truth are for all.
    • Signs from God sometimes seem desirable – and even reasonable to expect. Jesus reminds me that, if I want them, I may be looking in the wrong direction. I pray that I may see and appreciate where God is already at work in the events and relationships of my life.
    • My prayer time can train the eye of my heart to recognise God at work in my life. As I become more familiar with and trusting in God’s Spirit, I need less proof and am able to rely on what I have learnt. God trusts me. I learn to trust God’s spirit in me.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • If I was a Pharisee and I met this wandering healer-prophet, perhaps I would ask for a sign too. Many Christians look for signs like miracles, voices from heaven, Mary's image on rose petals, bleeding stigmata. Jesus points us away from spectacular signs. It is our faith in the person of Jesus that keeps us going. He points these Jewish men to the faith and perceptiveness of women and gentiles.
    • The opponents are looking for divine signs from Jesus. Something as outlandish as the splendour of the queen, or the miracle of Jonah. Jesus slides away from these demands. His divine sings are the compassion and especially the forgiveness of God. He was criticised because only God could forgive sins, and he claimed to do so. For saying he was equal to God he would be killed.
    • When we hear of Jonah we remember he was a reluctant prophet and he was also the one who resisted the call of the Lord to speak to the Gentiles, to enter into the world of the other, the foreigner, the ones who are not like ourselves. Jesus was like that - the one whose heart and words, love and truth are for all.
    • Signs from God sometimes seem desirable – and even reasonable to expect. Jesus reminds me that, if I want them, I may be looking in the wrong direction. I pray that I may see and appreciate where God is already at work in the events and relationships of my life.
    • My prayer time can train the eye of my heart to recognise God at work in my life. As I become more familiar with and trusting in God’s Spirit, I need less proof and am able to rely on what I have learnt. God trusts me. I learn to trust God’s spirit in me.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • If I was a Pharisee and I met this wandering healer-prophet, perhaps I would ask for a sign too. Many Christians look for signs like miracles, voices from heaven, Mary's image on rose petals, bleeding stigmata. Jesus points us away from spectacular signs. It is our faith in the person of Jesus that keeps us going. He points these Jewish men to the faith and perceptiveness of women and gentiles.
    • The opponents are looking for divine signs from Jesus. Something as outlandish as the splendour of the queen, or the miracle of Jonah. Jesus slides away from these demands. His divine sings are the compassion and especially the forgiveness of God. He was criticised because only God could forgive sins, and he claimed to do so. For saying he was equal to God he would be killed.
    • When we hear of Jonah we remember he was a reluctant prophet and he was also the one who resisted the call of the Lord to speak to the Gentiles, to enter into the world of the other, the foreigner, the ones who are not like ourselves. Jesus was like that - the one whose heart and words, love and truth are for all.
    • Signs from God sometimes seem desirable – and even reasonable to expect. Jesus reminds me that, if I want them, I may be looking in the wrong direction. I pray that I may see and appreciate where God is already at work in the events and relationships of my life.
    • My prayer time can train the eye of my heart to recognise God at work in my life. As I become more familiar with and trusting in God’s Spirit, I need less proof and am able to rely on what I have learnt. God trusts me. I learn to trust God’s spirit in me.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • If I was a Pharisee and I met this wandering healer-prophet, perhaps I would ask for a sign too. Many Christians look for signs like miracles, voices from heaven, Mary's image on rose petals, bleeding stigmata. Jesus points us away from spectacular signs. It is our faith in the person of Jesus that keeps us going. He points these Jewish men to the faith and perceptiveness of women and gentiles.
    • The opponents are looking for divine signs from Jesus. Something as outlandish as the splendour of the queen, or the miracle of Jonah. Jesus slides away from these demands. His divine sings are the compassion and especially the forgiveness of God. He was criticised because only God could forgive sins, and he claimed to do so. For saying he was equal to God he would be killed.
    • When we hear of Jonah we remember he was a reluctant prophet and he was also the one who resisted the call of the Lord to speak to the Gentiles, to enter into the world of the other, the foreigner, the ones who are not like ourselves. Jesus was like that - the one whose heart and words, love and truth are for all.
    • Signs from God sometimes seem desirable – and even reasonable to expect. Jesus reminds me that, if I want them, I may be looking in the wrong direction. I pray that I may see and appreciate where God is already at work in the events and relationships of my life.
    • My prayer time can train the eye of my heart to recognise God at work in my life. As I become more familiar with and trusting in God’s Spirit, I need less proof and am able to rely on what I have learnt. God trusts me. I learn to trust God’s spirit in me.