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Matthew 12:1-8

At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the Sabbath; his disciples were hungry, and they began to pluck heads of grain and to eat. When the Pharisees saw it, they said to him, "Look, your disciples are doing what is not lawful to do on the Sabbath." He said to them, "Have you not read what David did when he and his companions were hungry? He entered the house of God and ate the bread of the Presence, which it was not lawful for him or his companions to eat, but only for the priests. Or have you not read in the law that on the Sabbath the priests in the temple break the Sabbath and yet are guiltless? I tell you, something greater than the temple is here. But if you had known what this means, 'I desire mercy and not sacrifice,' you would not have condemned the guiltless. For the Son of Man is lord of the Sabbath."

Matthew 12:1-8
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • The Pharisees were stuck in their habit of finding fault – an easy trap for religious people to fall into. Jesus reminds them to really listen. The word of God is not given to us as an instruction manual but calls us to form our hearts. Jesus’ heart was not set on sacrifice, but on making evident God’s tender mercy.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Jesus shows understanding and compassion for his disciples who are hungry on the Sabbath. He says that a compassionate response to human need is certainly more important than slavish Sabbath observance. ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of my family, you did it to me’ (Matthew 25:40).
    • For Jesus, the practice of mercy and compassion, and especially toward the ‘guiltless’ and the needy, is far more important than Temple sacrifice and empty ritual. Lord, release me from slavery to law, and help me to experience ‘the freedom of the glory of the children of God’ (Romans 8:21).
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Jesus is like a big brother who defends his bewildered disciples against attack from the Pharisees. Lord, let me take courage from this. I am not alone in my struggles: you are always at my side, watching out for me.
    • Jesus is very sure about God’s love. For him, God is on our side: God would rather see us fed than go hungry. God’s great concern is love: all law must serve the law of love. Is this how I live – putting love before all else?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • The well-intentioned Pharisees could not stop themselves finding fault with others; paying careful attention to the details, they forgot the bigger picture. I look at life with the eye of Jesus, praying for a greater ability to understand and forgive the shortcomings of others – and my own.
    • I think of how I may need to be aware of any fundamentalism that seeks first to condemn or criticise. I am called instead to the mercy that Jesus embodied.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • The Bible gave a simple command: to keep the Sabbath holy. The rabbis went on to classify 39 sorts of work which were not permitted on the Sabbath. Jesus draws them back to the simplicity of God's command and defends his guiltless companions.
    • Lord, there are times when I throw rule-violations at people who in your eyes are doing what is innocent and natural. Forgive my foolish judgments.
    • Nothing is more central to the Christian life than Jesus Christ, his life, death, resurrection and his words. Regulations about the Sabbath - all religious regulations - were put into perspective. Our faith is about a person who is both God and human, whose life touches all the important times of our life – birth, ministry, suffering and death. The way we practice religion is to lead us to the true way, to comprehensive truth and to everlasting life.
    • Jesus highlights that a compassionate response to hunger and human need takes precedence over scrupulous observance of a ritual or a law. While the temple and all intuitional trappings of the gospel may have their relative importance, there are higher concerns. Jesus states that God - in this case, himself - and God's concerns are of higher value.
    • When my church is criticised it is easy to become defensive and self righteous. The gospel reminds me that Jesus often experienced rebuttal and told his disciples to expect it. I pray that I may act and speak more like Jesus did.
    • I am circumscribed by many laws, guidelines and regulations. I pray for the freedom and maturity that Jesus had never to let anything come between him and God.
    • The well-intentioned Pharisees could not stop themselves finding fault with others; paying careful attention to the details, they forgot the bigger picture. I look at life with the eye of Jesus, praying for a greater ability to understand and forgive the shortcomings of others - and my own.
    • I think of how I may need to be aware of any fundamentalism that seeks first to condemn or criticise. I am called instead to the mercy that Jesus embodied.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • The Bible gave a simple command: to keep the Sabbath holy. The rabbis went on to classify 39 sorts of work which were not permitted on the Sabbath. Jesus draws them back to the simplicity of God's command and defends his guiltless companions.
    • Lord, there are times when I throw rule-violations at people who in your eyes are doing what is innocent and natural. Forgive my foolish judgments.
    • Nothing is more central to the Christian life than Jesus Christ, his life, death, resurrection and his words. Regulations about the Sabbath - all religious regulations - were put into perspective. Our faith is about a person who is both God and human, whose life touches all the important times of our life – birth, ministry, suffering and death. The way we practice religion is to lead us to the true way, to comprehensive truth and to everlasting life.
    • Jesus highlights that a compassionate response to hunger and human need takes precedence over scrupulous observance of a ritual or a law. While the temple and all intuitional trappings of the gospel may have their relative importance, there are higher concerns. Jesus states that God - in this case, himself - and God's concerns are of higher value.
    • When my church is criticised it is easy to become defensive and self righteous. The gospel reminds me that Jesus often experienced rebuttal and told his disciples to expect it. I pray that I may act and speak more like Jesus did.
    • I am circumscribed by many laws, guidelines and regulations. I pray for the freedom and maturity that Jesus had never to let anything come between him and God.
    • The well-intentioned Pharisees could not stop themselves finding fault with others; paying careful attention to the details, they forgot the bigger picture. I look at life with the eye of Jesus, praying for a greater ability to understand and forgive the shortcomings of others - and my own.
    • I think of how I may need to be aware of any fundamentalism that seeks first to condemn or criticise. I am called instead to the mercy that Jesus embodied.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • The Bible gave a simple command: to keep the Sabbath holy. The rabbis went on to classify 39 sorts of work which were not permitted on the Sabbath. Jesus draws them back to the simplicity of God's command and defends his guiltless companions.
    • Lord, there are times when I throw rule-violations at people who in your eyes are doing what is innocent and natural. Forgive my foolish judgments.
    • Nothing is more central to the Christian life than Jesus Christ, his life, death, resurrection and his words. Regulations about the Sabbath - all religious regulations - were put into perspective. Our faith is about a person who is both God and human, whose life touches all the important times of our life – birth, ministry, suffering and death. The way we practice religion is to lead us to the true way, to comprehensive truth and to everlasting life.
    • Jesus highlights that a compassionate response to hunger and human need takes precedence over scrupulous observance of a ritual or a law. While the temple and all intuitional trappings of the gospel may have their relative importance, there are higher concerns. Jesus states that God - in this case, himself - and God's concerns are of higher value.
    • When my church is criticised it is easy to become defensive and self righteous. The gospel reminds me that Jesus often experienced rebuttal and told his disciples to expect it. I pray that I may act and speak more like Jesus did.
    • I am circumscribed by many laws, guidelines and regulations. I pray for the freedom and maturity that Jesus had never to let anything come between him and God.
    • The well-intentioned Pharisees could not stop themselves finding fault with others; paying careful attention to the details, they forgot the bigger picture. I look at life with the eye of Jesus, praying for a greater ability to understand and forgive the shortcomings of others - and my own.
    • I think of how I may need to be aware of any fundamentalism that seeks first to condemn or criticise. I am called instead to the mercy that Jesus embodied.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • The Bible gave a simple command: to keep the Sabbath holy. The rabbis went on to classify 39 sorts of work which were not permitted on the Sabbath. Jesus draws them back to the simplicity of God's command and defends his guiltless companions.
    • Lord, there are times when I throw rule-violations at people who in your eyes are doing what is innocent and natural. Forgive my foolish judgments.
    • Nothing is more central to the Christian life than Jesus Christ, his life, death, resurrection and his words. Regulations about the Sabbath - all religious regulations - were put into perspective. Our faith is about a person who is both God and human, whose life touches all the important times of our life – birth, ministry, suffering and death. The way we practice religion is to lead us to the true way, to comprehensive truth and to everlasting life.
    • Jesus highlights that a compassionate response to hunger and human need takes precedence over scrupulous observance of a ritual or a law. While the temple and all intuitional trappings of the gospel may have their relative importance, there are higher concerns. Jesus states that God - in this case, himself - and God's concerns are of higher value.
    • When my church is criticised it is easy to become defensive and self righteous. The gospel reminds me that Jesus often experienced rebuttal and told his disciples to expect it. I pray that I may act and speak more like Jesus did.
    • I am circumscribed by many laws, guidelines and regulations. I pray for the freedom and maturity that Jesus had never to let anything come between him and God.
    • The well-intentioned Pharisees could not stop themselves finding fault with others; paying careful attention to the details, they forgot the bigger picture. I look at life with the eye of Jesus, praying for a greater ability to understand and forgive the shortcomings of others - and my own.
    • I think of how I may need to be aware of any fundamentalism that seeks first to condemn or criticise. I am called instead to the mercy that Jesus embodied.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • The Bible gave a simple command: to keep the Sabbath holy. The rabbis went on to classify 39 sorts of work which were not permitted on the Sabbath. Jesus draws them back to the simplicity of God's command and defends his guiltless companions.
    • Lord, there are times when I throw rule-violations at people who in your eyes are doing what is innocent and natural. Forgive my foolish judgments.
    • Nothing is more central to the Christian life than Jesus Christ, his life, death, resurrection and his words. Regulations about the Sabbath - all religious regulations - were put into perspective. Our faith is about a person who is both God and human, whose life touches all the important times of our life – birth, ministry, suffering and death. The way we practice religion is to lead us to the true way, to comprehensive truth and to everlasting life.
    • Jesus highlights that a compassionate response to hunger and human need takes precedence over scrupulous observance of a ritual or a law. While the temple and all intuitional trappings of the gospel may have their relative importance, there are higher concerns. Jesus states that God - in this case, himself - and God's concerns are of higher value.
    • When my church is criticised it is easy to become defensive and self righteous. The gospel reminds me that Jesus often experienced rebuttal and told his disciples to expect it. I pray that I may act and speak more like Jesus did.
    • I am circumscribed by many laws, guidelines and regulations. I pray for the freedom and maturity that Jesus had never to let anything come between him and God.
    • The well-intentioned Pharisees could not stop themselves finding fault with others; paying careful attention to the details, they forgot the bigger picture. I look at life with the eye of Jesus, praying for a greater ability to understand and forgive the shortcomings of others - and my own.
    • I think of how I may need to be aware of any fundamentalism that seeks first to condemn or criticise. I am called instead to the mercy that Jesus embodied.