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Matthew 11:20-24

Then Jesus began to reproach the cities in which most of his deeds of power had been done, because they did not repent. "Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the deeds of power done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. But I tell you, on the day of judgment it will be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon than for you. And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? No, you will be brought down to Hades. For if the deeds of power done in you had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day. But I tell you that on the day of judgment it will be more tolerable for the land of Sodom than for you."

Matthew 11:20-24
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Jesus calls the townspeople to realise how fortunate they are: the message of life has been available to them but they have not paid attention. I take some time in quiet, asking God to reveal to me what I may have neglected. I want to turn from nothing that is for my good and so I ask God for the humility I need to listen again.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Jesus preaches a message of conversion and repentance for the forgiveness of sin. This message is received in different ways, depending on the faith which people have in Jesus. Lord, ‘I believe, help my unbelief’ (Mark 9:24).
    • Jesus lived in Capernaum for some time. He preached in the synagogue there. And yet his miracles were not enough to convince its citizens that he was from God. May my faith in the Lord Jesus and in his gospel enable me always to marvel at his wonderful deeds, and to give him unending praise and thanks.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • In Matthew’s Gospel, people show great enthusiasm for Jesus, on the level of getting him to cure their sick. But discipleship must go beyond selfish motivations. I must ask: ‘Lord, what do you need me to do to further the kingdom of God in my part of the world?’
    • Again Jesus uses shocking language, as he tried to break through complacency and smugness. Am I self-satisfied with my performance as a Christian, or do I allow the daily Gospel to challenge me?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Cities have always flattered themselves! It is easy to be proud of being first, biggest or best. All this counts for little in Jesus’ scale of things. I let Jesus recognise, not my achievements, but my quiet moments of discipleship, like the time I am giving to this prayer.
    • The deeds of power of Jesus went unnoticed. I pray that I may not miss the ways in which Jesus is present and active in my life.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • If sin is a turning away from God, then repentance is a turning back. Can I recognise my need to turn back? What /deeds of power/ is Jesus doing around me? Can I ask for the grace to see them, recognise them, respond to them? If I think repentance is for other, really sinful people, Jesus is telling me: /Wake up and smell the coffee/.
    • Jesus seems to expect some sort of change to happen in us when we meet him, or when we pray. Prayer is meant to have its fruits. If we want to know if we pray right, the question is to see how it affects our lives. The fruits of the Christian life are the fruits of the Holy Spirit – among them joy, peace, self-control, compassion and gentleness. The fruits are the marks of the disciple mentioned in the Beatitudes. Like the cities should have been different after the visits of Jesus, our lives are expanded by our prayer and love of God.
    • Jesus seems to expect results in his mission. So there is condemnation for the pride and arrogance which blocks the hearing of his mission. To human weakness and struggle Jesus shows compassion and a divine breadth of understanding; to pride and hypocrisy he speaks strongly, as in these few words to the cities he knew well.
    • If my prayer is real, I will meet not only the ‘gentle Jesus, meek and mild’ but will be challenged by Jesus vision that is greater than mine. As Jesus reproaches those who have been indifferent, I allow myself to feel uncomfortable. I ask forgiveness and I repent.
    • Cities have always flattered themselves! It is easy to be proud of being first, biggest or best. All this counts for little in Jesus' scale of things. I let Jesus recognise, not my achievements, but my quiet moments of discipleship, like the time I am giving to this prayer.
    • The deeds of power of Jesus went unnoticed. I pray that I may not miss the ways in which Jesus is present and active in my life.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • If sin is a turning away from God, then repentance is a turning back. Can I recognise my need to turn back? What /deeds of power/ is Jesus doing around me? Can I ask for the grace to see them, recognise them, respond to them? If I think repentance is for other, really sinful people, Jesus is telling me: /Wake up and smell the coffee/.
    • Jesus seems to expect some sort of change to happen in us when we meet him, or when we pray. Prayer is meant to have its fruits. If we want to know if we pray right, the question is to see how it affects our lives. The fruits of the Christian life are the fruits of the Holy Spirit – among them joy, peace, self-control, compassion and gentleness. The fruits are the marks of the disciple mentioned in the Beatitudes. Like the cities should have been different after the visits of Jesus, our lives are expanded by our prayer and love of God.
    • Jesus seems to expect results in his mission. So there is condemnation for the pride and arrogance which blocks the hearing of his mission. To human weakness and struggle Jesus shows compassion and a divine breadth of understanding; to pride and hypocrisy he speaks strongly, as in these few words to the cities he knew well.
    • If my prayer is real, I will meet not only the ‘gentle Jesus, meek and mild’ but will be challenged by Jesus vision that is greater than mine. As Jesus reproaches those who have been indifferent, I allow myself to feel uncomfortable. I ask forgiveness and I repent.
    • Cities have always flattered themselves! It is easy to be proud of being first, biggest or best. All this counts for little in Jesus' scale of things. I let Jesus recognise, not my achievements, but my quiet moments of discipleship, like the time I am giving to this prayer.
    • The deeds of power of Jesus went unnoticed. I pray that I may not miss the ways in which Jesus is present and active in my life.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • If sin is a turning away from God, then repentance is a turning back. Can I recognise my need to turn back? What /deeds of power/ is Jesus doing around me? Can I ask for the grace to see them, recognise them, respond to them? If I think repentance is for other, really sinful people, Jesus is telling me: /Wake up and smell the coffee/.
    • Jesus seems to expect some sort of change to happen in us when we meet him, or when we pray. Prayer is meant to have its fruits. If we want to know if we pray right, the question is to see how it affects our lives. The fruits of the Christian life are the fruits of the Holy Spirit – among them joy, peace, self-control, compassion and gentleness. The fruits are the marks of the disciple mentioned in the Beatitudes. Like the cities should have been different after the visits of Jesus, our lives are expanded by our prayer and love of God.
    • Jesus seems to expect results in his mission. So there is condemnation for the pride and arrogance which blocks the hearing of his mission. To human weakness and struggle Jesus shows compassion and a divine breadth of understanding; to pride and hypocrisy he speaks strongly, as in these few words to the cities he knew well.
    • If my prayer is real, I will meet not only the ‘gentle Jesus, meek and mild’ but will be challenged by Jesus vision that is greater than mine. As Jesus reproaches those who have been indifferent, I allow myself to feel uncomfortable. I ask forgiveness and I repent.
    • Cities have always flattered themselves! It is easy to be proud of being first, biggest or best. All this counts for little in Jesus' scale of things. I let Jesus recognise, not my achievements, but my quiet moments of discipleship, like the time I am giving to this prayer.
    • The deeds of power of Jesus went unnoticed. I pray that I may not miss the ways in which Jesus is present and active in my life.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • If sin is a turning away from God, then repentance is a turning back. Can I recognise my need to turn back? What /deeds of power/ is Jesus doing around me? Can I ask for the grace to see them, recognise them, respond to them? If I think repentance is for other, really sinful people, Jesus is telling me: /Wake up and smell the coffee/.
    • Jesus seems to expect some sort of change to happen in us when we meet him, or when we pray. Prayer is meant to have its fruits. If we want to know if we pray right, the question is to see how it affects our lives. The fruits of the Christian life are the fruits of the Holy Spirit – among them joy, peace, self-control, compassion and gentleness. The fruits are the marks of the disciple mentioned in the Beatitudes. Like the cities should have been different after the visits of Jesus, our lives are expanded by our prayer and love of God.
    • Jesus seems to expect results in his mission. So there is condemnation for the pride and arrogance which blocks the hearing of his mission. To human weakness and struggle Jesus shows compassion and a divine breadth of understanding; to pride and hypocrisy he speaks strongly, as in these few words to the cities he knew well.
    • If my prayer is real, I will meet not only the ‘gentle Jesus, meek and mild’ but will be challenged by Jesus vision that is greater than mine. As Jesus reproaches those who have been indifferent, I allow myself to feel uncomfortable. I ask forgiveness and I repent.
    • Cities have always flattered themselves! It is easy to be proud of being first, biggest or best. All this counts for little in Jesus' scale of things. I let Jesus recognise, not my achievements, but my quiet moments of discipleship, like the time I am giving to this prayer.
    • The deeds of power of Jesus went unnoticed. I pray that I may not miss the ways in which Jesus is present and active in my life.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • If sin is a turning away from God, then repentance is a turning back. Can I recognise my need to turn back? What /deeds of power/ is Jesus doing around me? Can I ask for the grace to see them, recognise them, respond to them? If I think repentance is for other, really sinful people, Jesus is telling me: /Wake up and smell the coffee/.
    • Jesus seems to expect some sort of change to happen in us when we meet him, or when we pray. Prayer is meant to have its fruits. If we want to know if we pray right, the question is to see how it affects our lives. The fruits of the Christian life are the fruits of the Holy Spirit – among them joy, peace, self-control, compassion and gentleness. The fruits are the marks of the disciple mentioned in the Beatitudes. Like the cities should have been different after the visits of Jesus, our lives are expanded by our prayer and love of God.
    • Jesus seems to expect results in his mission. So there is condemnation for the pride and arrogance which blocks the hearing of his mission. To human weakness and struggle Jesus shows compassion and a divine breadth of understanding; to pride and hypocrisy he speaks strongly, as in these few words to the cities he knew well.
    • If my prayer is real, I will meet not only the ‘gentle Jesus, meek and mild’ but will be challenged by Jesus vision that is greater than mine. As Jesus reproaches those who have been indifferent, I allow myself to feel uncomfortable. I ask forgiveness and I repent.
    • Cities have always flattered themselves! It is easy to be proud of being first, biggest or best. All this counts for little in Jesus' scale of things. I let Jesus recognise, not my achievements, but my quiet moments of discipleship, like the time I am giving to this prayer.
    • The deeds of power of Jesus went unnoticed. I pray that I may not miss the ways in which Jesus is present and active in my life.