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Luke 6:1-5

One sabbath while Jesus was going through the grainfields, his disciples plucked some heads of grain, rubbed them in their hands, and ate them. But some of the Pharisees said, "Why are you doing what is not lawful on the sabbath?" Jesus answered, "Have you not read what David did when he and his companions were hungry? He entered the house of God and took and ate the bread of the Presence, which it is not lawful for any but the priests to eat, and gave some to his companions?" Then he said to them, "The Son of Man is lord of the sabbath."

Luke 6:1-5
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Sunday. Blessed Sunday. Is it a day of rest for me? Sunday can be a gift, a privileged moment to find inner calm. It is a time to shed the stress of work and let cares fall away. It is a time to walk leisurely with my God in his world of nature. It is a time to recapture reverence for the holy world gifted to us. It is a time for speaking the names of each member of the family with love and gratitude.
    • Is Sunday my day for meeting the Lord of the Sabbath? Is it the day of Resurrection, when I celebrate the joy that the Lord Jesus is with me, forever?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • The Pharisees sought to preserve structures and strictures but they had lost sight of ordinary human needs. Jesus called them back to a better sense of what is important. Jesus hears what distracts me and calls me to truth.
    • The accusing party is not always others or authority; sometimes we don’t allow ourselves away with anything, but spend time chiding, scolding and not letting go. I ask Jesus’ help to be able to listen to what is really important.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • It starts as a relaxed rural scene: Jesus and the twelve wandering by a field of ripe wheat, and almost absent-mindedly plucking some ears, rubbing them in their hands, and eating the grain. It turns into a solemn assertion. When Jesus claims to be lord of the Sabbath, he does not mean that he is just an arbiter in legal disputes over precisely what is allowed on the Sabbath. Rather he claims to have dominion over the third commandment, and over the Law itself.
    • The link of faith and human needs is strong in this incident. Religion and humanity are intrinsically linked. Hunger for ordinary food is taken seriously by Jesus, so that religious laws may be set aside. This incident can bring to mind the reality of starvation for many millions in our world. Can we ensure that the bread of ordinary life is more equally shared among the loved ones of God?
    • While Jesus valued rituals, he did not see them as the source and summit of religion. Ritual is empty if it is not sourced in relationship. Ritual is alive and relevant when begun in personal and communal prayer. What we gather from God in the time of prayer brings life, joy and relevance to the rituals and the customs of religion. No ritual, not even the Sabbath of the people of Jesus’ time, is to lord it over us.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It starts as a relaxed rural scene: Jesus and the twelve wandering by a field of ripe wheat, and almost absent-mindedly plucking some ears, rubbing them in their hands, and eating the grain. It turns into a solemn assertion. When Jesus claims to be lord of the Sabbath, he does not mean that he is just an arbiter in legal disputes over precisely what is allowed on the Sabbath. Rather he claims to have dominion over the third commandment, and over the Law itself.
    • The link of faith and human needs is strong in this incident. Religion and humanity are intrinsically linked. Hunger for ordinary food is taken seriously by Jesus, so that religious laws may be set aside. This incident can bring to mind the reality of starvation for many millions in our world. Can we ensure that the bread of ordinary life is more equally shared among the loved ones of God?
    • While Jesus valued rituals, he did not see them as the source and summit of religion. Ritual is empty if it is not sourced in relationship. Ritual is alive and relevant when begun in personal and communal prayer. What we gather from God in the time of prayer brings life, joy and relevance to the rituals and the customs of religion. No ritual, not even the Sabbath of the people of Jesus’ time, is to lord it over us.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • It starts as a relaxed rural scene: Jesus and the twelve wandering by a field of ripe wheat, and almost absent-mindedly plucking some ears, rubbing them in their hands, and eating the grain. It turns into a solemn assertion. When Jesus claims to be lord of the Sabbath, he does not mean that he is just an arbiter in legal disputes over precisely what is allowed on the Sabbath. Rather he claims to have dominion over the third commandment, and over the Law itself.
    • The link of faith and human needs is strong in this incident. Religion and humanity are intrinsically linked. Hunger for ordinary food is taken seriously by Jesus, so that religious laws may be set aside. This incident can bring to mind the reality of starvation for many millions in our world. Can we ensure that the bread of ordinary life is more equally shared among the loved ones of God?
    • While Jesus valued rituals, he did not see them as the source and summit of religion. Ritual is empty if it is not sourced in relationship. Ritual is alive and relevant when begun in personal and communal prayer. What we gather from God in the time of prayer brings life, joy and relevance to the rituals and the customs of religion. No ritual, not even the Sabbath of the people of Jesus’ time, is to lord it over us.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • The Pharisees sought to preserve structures and strictures but they had lost sight of ordinary human needs. Jesus called them back to a better sense of what is important. Jesus hears what distracts me and calls me to truth.
    • The accusing party is not always others or authority; sometimes we don’t allow ourselves away with anything, but spend time chiding, scolding and not letting go. I ask Jesus’ help to be able to listen to what is really important.