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Luke 18:9-14

The Word of God

Jesus also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: "Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, 'God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.' But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, 'God, be merciful to me, a sinner!' I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted."

Luke 18:9-14
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • One went to the temple to praise himself, the other to praise God! One to ask for nothing, the other to ask for everything. God looks kindly on the humble heart, and leads us from pride to humility, for he loves us in pride and humility.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • God, be merciful to me, a sinner’ – let this be my prayer today and always. I must not leave my place of prayer today, thankful that I am not like the Pharisee! It is God who ‘justifies’ the ungodly tax collector, whose only virtue is that he is honest before God.
    • Am I honest with myself when I come before you, Lord? You read my poor heart. It is the real me whom you love, warts and all. I pray for humility.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • The Pharisee is not actually condemned by Jesus. In fact, many of the things he does are good. However, his prayer is less acceptable to God because he trusts in his own righteousness, whereas the tax collector throws himself wholly on God’s mercy. One is centred on God; the other is centred on himself.
    • The Pharisee derives his satisfaction from the fact that he does not commit the sins that other people do. But what matters is not avoiding this and doing that, but rather handing oneself over to God’s mercy.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
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    • This parable, addressed to some proud and arrogant people, was meant to sting.
    • Can I get in touch with the power of Jesus' rebuke?
    • Do I hear the call to a different way of living?
    • What does it say to me?
    • The contrast between Pharisee and publican has entered so deeply into our culture that it is sometimes reversed, and people are more anxious to hide at the back of the church than to be in the front pews.
    • How does the story hit me? I would hate to be the object of people's contempt. But Lord, if they knew me as you do, they might be right to feel contempt. And I have no right to look down on those whose sins are paraded in the media. Be merciful to me.
    • What would you like to boast to God about? Let's be honest. There are times when we want to tell him how good we are, or the good we have done. We may look down on others' moral or spiritual life. This is just human. But it's not to be the end of the story of our relationship with God. We look on what is good in ourselves and know that all is gift; both our talents and what we have made of them. We end up with the prayer of the taxman - cover me O Lord with your mercy, for, with all my good deeds and intentions, there is a deeply sinful side of me which needs your mercy.
    • To know oneself as a humble child of God, dependent on God for everything, is a grace to be asked for in prayer. The tax collector is a more attractive person, despite his job which was looked down on at the time, than the externally holy Pharisee. It is a grace of God to know we need his mercy. Prayer is a time of relaxing into the merciful love of God, whose compassion and understanding of each of us is greater than anything else in him.
    • The Pharisee and the tax collector spoke about themselves to God. Their attitudes to others were starkly in contrast. As I come to pray I may speak to God humbly about me and about my neighbours that I make sure to take time to listen for the voice of the Lord.
    • I allow my prayer to be, 'God be merciful to me, a sinner'. I identify myself without excuses and I address myself to God, confident of being met with love and mercy.
    • Jesus cautions me against anything that elevates me or sets me apart from others. I ask God to help me to be aware of any attitudes or words that demean other people.
    • I place myself with the humble tax collector, asking God for mercy as I realise that I am a sinner. I ask God to help me to know my need without becoming disheartened.
    • The Pharisee did not just think well of himself but did so at the expense of other people, Looking down on them from the height to which she had exalted himself. Are there ways in which I promote myself?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This parable, addressed to some proud and arrogant people, was meant to sting.
    • Can I get in touch with the power of Jesus' rebuke?
    • Do I hear the call to a different way of living?
    • What does it say to me?
    • The contrast between Pharisee and publican has entered so deeply into our culture that it is sometimes reversed, and people are more anxious to hide at the back of the church than to be in the front pews.
    • How does the story hit me? I would hate to be the object of people's contempt. But Lord, if they knew me as you do, they might be right to feel contempt. And I have no right to look down on those whose sins are paraded in the media. Be merciful to me.
    • What would you like to boast to God about? Let's be honest. There are times when we want to tell him how good we are, or the good we have done. We may look down on others' moral or spiritual life. This is just human. But it's not to be the end of the story of our relationship with God. We look on what is good in ourselves and know that all is gift; both our talents and what we have made of them. We end up with the prayer of the taxman - cover me O Lord with your mercy, for, with all my good deeds and intentions, there is a deeply sinful side of me which needs your mercy.
    • To know oneself as a humble child of God, dependent on God for everything, is a grace to be asked for in prayer. The tax collector is a more attractive person, despite his job which was looked down on at the time, than the externally holy Pharisee. It is a grace of God to know we need his mercy. Prayer is a time of relaxing into the merciful love of God, whose compassion and understanding of each of us is greater than anything else in him.
    • The Pharisee and the tax collector spoke about themselves to God. Their attitudes to others were starkly in contrast. As I come to pray I may speak to God humbly about me and about my neighbours that I make sure to take time to listen for the voice of the Lord.
    • I allow my prayer to be, 'God be merciful to me, a sinner'. I identify myself without excuses and I address myself to God, confident of being met with love and mercy.
    • Jesus cautions me against anything that elevates me or sets me apart from others. I ask God to help me to be aware of any attitudes or words that demean other people.
    • I place myself with the humble tax collector, asking God for mercy as I realise that I am a sinner. I ask God to help me to know my need without becoming disheartened.
    • The Pharisee did not just think well of himself but did so at the expense of other people, Looking down on them from the height to which she had exalted himself. Are there ways in which I promote myself?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This parable, addressed to some proud and arrogant people, was meant to sting.
    • Can I get in touch with the power of Jesus' rebuke?
    • Do I hear the call to a different way of living?
    • What does it say to me?
    • The contrast between Pharisee and publican has entered so deeply into our culture that it is sometimes reversed, and people are more anxious to hide at the back of the church than to be in the front pews.
    • How does the story hit me? I would hate to be the object of people's contempt. But Lord, if they knew me as you do, they might be right to feel contempt. And I have no right to look down on those whose sins are paraded in the media. Be merciful to me.
    • What would you like to boast to God about? Let's be honest. There are times when we want to tell him how good we are, or the good we have done. We may look down on others' moral or spiritual life. This is just human. But it's not to be the end of the story of our relationship with God. We look on what is good in ourselves and know that all is gift; both our talents and what we have made of them. We end up with the prayer of the taxman - cover me O Lord with your mercy, for, with all my good deeds and intentions, there is a deeply sinful side of me which needs your mercy.
    • To know oneself as a humble child of God, dependent on God for everything, is a grace to be asked for in prayer. The tax collector is a more attractive person, despite his job which was looked down on at the time, than the externally holy Pharisee. It is a grace of God to know we need his mercy. Prayer is a time of relaxing into the merciful love of God, whose compassion and understanding of each of us is greater than anything else in him.
    • The Pharisee and the tax collector spoke about themselves to God. Their attitudes to others were starkly in contrast. As I come to pray I may speak to God humbly about me and about my neighbours that I make sure to take time to listen for the voice of the Lord.
    • I allow my prayer to be, 'God be merciful to me, a sinner'. I identify myself without excuses and I address myself to God, confident of being met with love and mercy.
    • Jesus cautions me against anything that elevates me or sets me apart from others. I ask God to help me to be aware of any attitudes or words that demean other people.
    • I place myself with the humble tax collector, asking God for mercy as I realise that I am a sinner. I ask God to help me to know my need without becoming disheartened.
    • The Pharisee did not just think well of himself but did so at the expense of other people, Looking down on them from the height to which she had exalted himself. Are there ways in which I promote myself?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This parable, addressed to some proud and arrogant people, was meant to sting.
    • Can I get in touch with the power of Jesus' rebuke?
    • Do I hear the call to a different way of living?
    • What does it say to me?
    • The contrast between Pharisee and publican has entered so deeply into our culture that it is sometimes reversed, and people are more anxious to hide at the back of the church than to be in the front pews.
    • How does the story hit me? I would hate to be the object of people's contempt. But Lord, if they knew me as you do, they might be right to feel contempt. And I have no right to look down on those whose sins are paraded in the media. Be merciful to me.
    • What would you like to boast to God about? Let's be honest. There are times when we want to tell him how good we are, or the good we have done. We may look down on others' moral or spiritual life. This is just human. But it's not to be the end of the story of our relationship with God. We look on what is good in ourselves and know that all is gift; both our talents and what we have made of them. We end up with the prayer of the taxman - cover me O Lord with your mercy, for, with all my good deeds and intentions, there is a deeply sinful side of me which needs your mercy.
    • To know oneself as a humble child of God, dependent on God for everything, is a grace to be asked for in prayer. The tax collector is a more attractive person, despite his job which was looked down on at the time, than the externally holy Pharisee. It is a grace of God to know we need his mercy. Prayer is a time of relaxing into the merciful love of God, whose compassion and understanding of each of us is greater than anything else in him.
    • The Pharisee and the tax collector spoke about themselves to God. Their attitudes to others were starkly in contrast. As I come to pray I may speak to God humbly about me and about my neighbours that I make sure to take time to listen for the voice of the Lord.
    • I allow my prayer to be, 'God be merciful to me, a sinner'. I identify myself without excuses and I address myself to God, confident of being met with love and mercy.
    • Jesus cautions me against anything that elevates me or sets me apart from others. I ask God to help me to be aware of any attitudes or words that demean other people.
    • I place myself with the humble tax collector, asking God for mercy as I realise that I am a sinner. I ask God to help me to know my need without becoming disheartened.
    • The Pharisee did not just think well of himself but did so at the expense of other people, Looking down on them from the height to which she had exalted himself. Are there ways in which I promote myself?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This parable, addressed to some proud and arrogant people, was meant to sting.
    • Can I get in touch with the power of Jesus' rebuke?
    • Do I hear the call to a different way of living?
    • What does it say to me?
    • The contrast between Pharisee and publican has entered so deeply into our culture that it is sometimes reversed, and people are more anxious to hide at the back of the church than to be in the front pews.
    • How does the story hit me? I would hate to be the object of people's contempt. But Lord, if they knew me as you do, they might be right to feel contempt. And I have no right to look down on those whose sins are paraded in the media. Be merciful to me.
    • What would you like to boast to God about? Let's be honest. There are times when we want to tell him how good we are, or the good we have done. We may look down on others' moral or spiritual life. This is just human. But it's not to be the end of the story of our relationship with God. We look on what is good in ourselves and know that all is gift; both our talents and what we have made of them. We end up with the prayer of the taxman - cover me O Lord with your mercy, for, with all my good deeds and intentions, there is a deeply sinful side of me which needs your mercy.
    • To know oneself as a humble child of God, dependent on God for everything, is a grace to be asked for in prayer. The tax collector is a more attractive person, despite his job which was looked down on at the time, than the externally holy Pharisee. It is a grace of God to know we need his mercy. Prayer is a time of relaxing into the merciful love of God, whose compassion and understanding of each of us is greater than anything else in him.
    • The Pharisee and the tax collector spoke about themselves to God. Their attitudes to others were starkly in contrast. As I come to pray I may speak to God humbly about me and about my neighbours that I make sure to take time to listen for the voice of the Lord.
    • I allow my prayer to be, 'God be merciful to me, a sinner'. I identify myself without excuses and I address myself to God, confident of being met with love and mercy.
    • Jesus cautions me against anything that elevates me or sets me apart from others. I ask God to help me to be aware of any attitudes or words that demean other people.
    • I place myself with the humble tax collector, asking God for mercy as I realise that I am a sinner. I ask God to help me to know my need without becoming disheartened.
    • The Pharisee did not just think well of himself but did so at the expense of other people, Looking down on them from the height to which she had exalted himself. Are there ways in which I promote myself?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This parable, addressed to some proud and arrogant people, was meant to sting.
    • Can I get in touch with the power of Jesus' rebuke?
    • Do I hear the call to a different way of living?
    • What does it say to me?
    • The contrast between Pharisee and publican has entered so deeply into our culture that it is sometimes reversed, and people are more anxious to hide at the back of the church than to be in the front pews.
    • How does the story hit me? I would hate to be the object of people's contempt. But Lord, if they knew me as you do, they might be right to feel contempt. And I have no right to look down on those whose sins are paraded in the media. Be merciful to me.
    • What would you like to boast to God about? Let's be honest. There are times when we want to tell him how good we are, or the good we have done. We may look down on others' moral or spiritual life. This is just human. But it's not to be the end of the story of our relationship with God. We look on what is good in ourselves and know that all is gift; both our talents and what we have made of them. We end up with the prayer of the taxman - cover me O Lord with your mercy, for, with all my good deeds and intentions, there is a deeply sinful side of me which needs your mercy.
    • To know oneself as a humble child of God, dependent on God for everything, is a grace to be asked for in prayer. The tax collector is a more attractive person, despite his job which was looked down on at the time, than the externally holy Pharisee. It is a grace of God to know we need his mercy. Prayer is a time of relaxing into the merciful love of God, whose compassion and understanding of each of us is greater than anything else in him.
    • The Pharisee and the tax collector spoke about themselves to God. Their attitudes to others were starkly in contrast. As I come to pray I may speak to God humbly about me and about my neighbours that I make sure to take time to listen for the voice of the Lord.
    • I allow my prayer to be, 'God be merciful to me, a sinner'. I identify myself without excuses and I address myself to God, confident of being met with love and mercy.
    • Jesus cautions me against anything that elevates me or sets me apart from others. I ask God to help me to be aware of any attitudes or words that demean other people.
    • I place myself with the humble tax collector, asking God for mercy as I realise that I am a sinner. I ask God to help me to know my need without becoming disheartened.
    • The Pharisee did not just think well of himself but did so at the expense of other people, Looking down on them from the height to which she had exalted himself. Are there ways in which I promote myself?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This parable, addressed to some proud and arrogant people, was meant to sting.
    • Can I get in touch with the power of Jesus' rebuke?
    • Do I hear the call to a different way of living?
    • What does it say to me?
    • The contrast between Pharisee and publican has entered so deeply into our culture that it is sometimes reversed, and people are more anxious to hide at the back of the church than to be in the front pews.
    • How does the story hit me? I would hate to be the object of people's contempt. But Lord, if they knew me as you do, they might be right to feel contempt. And I have no right to look down on those whose sins are paraded in the media. Be merciful to me.
    • What would you like to boast to God about? Let's be honest. There are times when we want to tell him how good we are, or the good we have done. We may look down on others' moral or spiritual life. This is just human. But it's not to be the end of the story of our relationship with God. We look on what is good in ourselves and know that all is gift; both our talents and what we have made of them. We end up with the prayer of the taxman - cover me O Lord with your mercy, for, with all my good deeds and intentions, there is a deeply sinful side of me which needs your mercy.
    • To know oneself as a humble child of God, dependent on God for everything, is a grace to be asked for in prayer. The tax collector is a more attractive person, despite his job which was looked down on at the time, than the externally holy Pharisee. It is a grace of God to know we need his mercy. Prayer is a time of relaxing into the merciful love of God, whose compassion and understanding of each of us is greater than anything else in him.
    • The Pharisee and the tax collector spoke about themselves to God. Their attitudes to others were starkly in contrast. As I come to pray I may speak to God humbly about me and about my neighbours that I make sure to take time to listen for the voice of the Lord.
    • I allow my prayer to be, 'God be merciful to me, a sinner'. I identify myself without excuses and I address myself to God, confident of being met with love and mercy.
    • Jesus cautions me against anything that elevates me or sets me apart from others. I ask God to help me to be aware of any attitudes or words that demean other people.
    • I place myself with the humble tax collector, asking God for mercy as I realise that I am a sinner. I ask God to help me to know my need without becoming disheartened.
    • The Pharisee did not just think well of himself but did so at the expense of other people, Looking down on them from the height to which she had exalted himself. Are there ways in which I promote myself?