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Luke 16:19-31

Jesus said to the Pharisees, "There was a rich man who was dressed in purple and fine linen and who feasted sumptuously every day. And at his gate lay a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, who longed to satisfy his hunger with what fell from the rich man's table; even the dogs would come and lick his sores. The poor man died and was carried away by the angels to be with Abraham. The rich man also died and was buried. In Hades, where he was being tormented, he looked up and saw Abraham far away with Lazarus by his side. He called out, 'Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue; for I am in agony in these flames.' But Abraham said, 'Child, remember that during your lifetime you received your good things, and Lazarus in like manner evil things; but now he is comforted here, and you are in agony. Besides all this, between you and us a great chasm has been fixed, so that those who might want to pass from here to you cannot do so, and no one can cross from there to us.' He said, 'Then, father, I beg you to send him to my father's house -- for I have five brothers -- that he may warn them, so that they will not also come into this place of torment.' Abraham replied, 'They have Moses and the prophets; they should listen to them.' He said, 'No, father Abraham; but if someone goes to them from the dead, they will repent.' He said to him, 'If they do not listen to Moses and the prophets, neither will they be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.'"

Luke 16:19-31
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • We can move too quickly through this parable - we know it and its ending well. Stay in prayer with its beginning. Nobody should be covered in sores and hungry; nobody should be comforted only by dogs. In a world of homelessness, hunger and loneliness, should anyone be dressed so well and feast so well? One had no choice but to fast, the other had a choice to help. Saint Ignatius wrote for each day, ‘Who will I help today?’
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • This parable is addressed to the religious leaders of the time. But it applies to each of us, especially those who have been blessed with privilege, money, talent, education etc. There’s nothing wrong with being rich in any of these ways. It’s how we use our riches that matters eternally.
    • In the modern world we all know Lazarus and his millions of companions. The hungry, deprived, dispossessed, exploited are lying at our gates in the First World. We are uncomfortably aware of them and their needs. Like the rich man in the parable we have no excuse.
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    • Some people can enjoy the height of fashion. For them, life is a daily feast in well-defended mansions. In contrast the poor are clothed in running sores and lie among dogs. They are famished and weak, and are excluded from the good things of life. Both rich and poor die, but then their fortunes are reversed. Because God is pure compassion, the poor are brought straight into the kingdom of God, while the rich have to endure the pain of conversion. I ponder the mysterious workings of God’s providence.
    • The rich think of the poor as their servants. Twice in the story the rich man asks God to send the poor man on errands that will help his own cause. But self-centred choices gain no credit in God’s eyes. The hearts of the rich must melt when the see the plight of the poor. I pray for the rich that they be converted, and I ask to be shown how to share my own possessions with the needy.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • This is a parable of startling contrasts, but its central message is simple: be alert to the needs under your nose. It is not concerned with patterns of good living on the part of Lazarus, nor of evil-doing on the part of the rich man. But the latter closed his eyes to the needy at his gate. And without an eye for the needy around us, our life becomes self-centred and callous. Jesus is asking his listeners to open their eyes to what is around them, and to open their ears to the simple commands of the Gospel: love your neighbour.
    • This is a great story with no ambiguity about it. We have an obligation as Christians to feed the hungry. Every hungry man and woman in the world is on our conscience. While we did not create the problem, we can be part of the solution. Our hearts go out to the millions of old and young in the world just because they are hungry, like Lazarus was at the rich man's gate. Allow some prayer today to enlarge your compassion for the hungry and your desire to do what you can to feed them, for in feeding them, we feed Jesus.
    • This story reminds us of the huge inequality of people in Jesus' time and still today. The parable invites us to see ourselves as richer in the goods of the world than many millions. Even by having access to this text, you count among the privileged world. Praying on this story will simply challenge us into care for the needy in whatever way we can improve the lives of very poor people.
    • During Lent I try to hear the call to come back home to God. I join the great pilgrimage of people who, through the ages, have been called by Moses and the prophets to listen to the word of the Lord.
    • I asked for a greater sensitivity to those who live with nothing and think of how I might show some compassion to those whose need is greater than mine.  
    • The rich man had some feeling for his brothers, if little for the poor man at his gate. I pray that my sense of fellowship be broader than any limits of class, country or religion that the world teaches me to observe.
    • God’s message is abundantly clear, Jesus says. I ask God to help me to perceive, attend and follow God’s word in this day.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This is a parable of startling contrasts, but its central message is simple: be alert to the needs under your nose. It is not concerned with patterns of good living on the part of Lazarus, nor of evil-doing on the part of the rich man. But the latter closed his eyes to the needy at his gate. And without an eye for the needy around us, our life becomes self-centred and callous. Jesus is asking his listeners to open their eyes to what is around them, and to open their ears to the simple commands of the Gospel: love your neighbour.
    • This is a great story with no ambiguity about it. We have an obligation as Christians to feed the hungry. Every hungry man and woman in the world is on our conscience. While we did not create the problem, we can be part of the solution. Our hearts go out to the millions of old and young in the world just because they are hungry, like Lazarus was at the rich man's gate. Allow some prayer today to enlarge your compassion for the hungry and your desire to do what you can to feed them, for in feeding them, we feed Jesus.
    • This story reminds us of the huge inequality of people in Jesus' time and still today. The parable invites us to see ourselves as richer in the goods of the world than many millions. Even by having access to this text, you count among the privileged world. Praying on this story will simply challenge us into care for the needy in whatever way we can improve the lives of very poor people.
    • During Lent I try to hear the call to come back home to God. I join the great pilgrimage of people who, through the ages, have been called by Moses and the prophets to listen to the word of the Lord.
    • I asked for a greater sensitivity to those who live with nothing and think of how I might show some compassion to those whose need is greater than mine.  
    • The rich man had some feeling for his brothers, if little for the poor man at his gate. I pray that my sense of fellowship be broader than any limits of class, country or religion that the world teaches me to observe.
    • God’s message is abundantly clear, Jesus says. I ask God to help me to perceive, attend and follow God’s word in this day.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This is a parable of startling contrasts, but its central message is simple: be alert to the needs under your nose. It is not concerned with patterns of good living on the part of Lazarus, nor of evil-doing on the part of the rich man. But the latter closed his eyes to the needy at his gate. And without an eye for the needy around us, our life becomes self-centred and callous. Jesus is asking his listeners to open their eyes to what is around them, and to open their ears to the simple commands of the Gospel: love your neighbour.
    • This is a great story with no ambiguity about it. We have an obligation as Christians to feed the hungry. Every hungry man and woman in the world is on our conscience. While we did not create the problem, we can be part of the solution. Our hearts go out to the millions of old and young in the world just because they are hungry, like Lazarus was at the rich man's gate. Allow some prayer today to enlarge your compassion for the hungry and your desire to do what you can to feed them, for in feeding them, we feed Jesus.
    • This story reminds us of the huge inequality of people in Jesus' time and still today. The parable invites us to see ourselves as richer in the goods of the world than many millions. Even by having access to this text, you count among the privileged world. Praying on this story will simply challenge us into care for the needy in whatever way we can improve the lives of very poor people.
    • During Lent I try to hear the call to come back home to God. I join the great pilgrimage of people who, through the ages, have been called by Moses and the prophets to listen to the word of the Lord.
    • I asked for a greater sensitivity to those who live with nothing and think of how I might show some compassion to those whose need is greater than mine.  
    • The rich man had some feeling for his brothers, if little for the poor man at his gate. I pray that my sense of fellowship be broader than any limits of class, country or religion that the world teaches me to observe.
    • God’s message is abundantly clear, Jesus says. I ask God to help me to perceive, attend and follow God’s word in this day.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This is a parable of startling contrasts, but its central message is simple: be alert to the needs under your nose. It is not concerned with patterns of good living on the part of Lazarus, nor of evil-doing on the part of the rich man. But the latter closed his eyes to the needy at his gate. And without an eye for the needy around us, our life becomes self-centred and callous. Jesus is asking his listeners to open their eyes to what is around them, and to open their ears to the simple commands of the Gospel: love your neighbour.
    • This is a great story with no ambiguity about it. We have an obligation as Christians to feed the hungry. Every hungry man and woman in the world is on our conscience. While we did not create the problem, we can be part of the solution. Our hearts go out to the millions of old and young in the world just because they are hungry, like Lazarus was at the rich man's gate. Allow some prayer today to enlarge your compassion for the hungry and your desire to do what you can to feed them, for in feeding them, we feed Jesus.
    • This story reminds us of the huge inequality of people in Jesus' time and still today. The parable invites us to see ourselves as richer in the goods of the world than many millions. Even by having access to this text, you count among the privileged world. Praying on this story will simply challenge us into care for the needy in whatever way we can improve the lives of very poor people.
    • During Lent I try to hear the call to come back home to God. I join the great pilgrimage of people who, through the ages, have been called by Moses and the prophets to listen to the word of the Lord.
    • I asked for a greater sensitivity to those who live with nothing and think of how I might show some compassion to those whose need is greater than mine.  
    • The rich man had some feeling for his brothers, if little for the poor man at his gate. I pray that my sense of fellowship be broader than any limits of class, country or religion that the world teaches me to observe.
    • God’s message is abundantly clear, Jesus says. I ask God to help me to perceive, attend and follow God’s word in this day.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This is a parable of startling contrasts, but its central message is simple: be alert to the needs under your nose. It is not concerned with patterns of good living on the part of Lazarus, nor of evil-doing on the part of the rich man. But the latter closed his eyes to the needy at his gate. And without an eye for the needy around us, our life becomes self-centred and callous. Jesus is asking his listeners to open their eyes to what is around them, and to open their ears to the simple commands of the Gospel: love your neighbour.
    • This is a great story with no ambiguity about it. We have an obligation as Christians to feed the hungry. Every hungry man and woman in the world is on our conscience. While we did not create the problem, we can be part of the solution. Our hearts go out to the millions of old and young in the world just because they are hungry, like Lazarus was at the rich man's gate. Allow some prayer today to enlarge your compassion for the hungry and your desire to do what you can to feed them, for in feeding them, we feed Jesus.
    • This story reminds us of the huge inequality of people in Jesus' time and still today. The parable invites us to see ourselves as richer in the goods of the world than many millions. Even by having access to this text, you count among the privileged world. Praying on this story will simply challenge us into care for the needy in whatever way we can improve the lives of very poor people.
    • During Lent I try to hear the call to come back home to God. I join the great pilgrimage of people who, through the ages, have been called by Moses and the prophets to listen to the word of the Lord.
    • I asked for a greater sensitivity to those who live with nothing and think of how I might show some compassion to those whose need is greater than mine.  
    • The rich man had some feeling for his brothers, if little for the poor man at his gate. I pray that my sense of fellowship be broader than any limits of class, country or religion that the world teaches me to observe.
    • God’s message is abundantly clear, Jesus says. I ask God to help me to perceive, attend and follow God’s word in this day.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This is a parable of startling contrasts, but its central message is simple: be alert to the needs under your nose. It is not concerned with patterns of good living on the part of Lazarus, nor of evil-doing on the part of the rich man. But the latter closed his eyes to the needy at his gate. And without an eye for the needy around us, our life becomes self-centred and callous. Jesus is asking his listeners to open their eyes to what is around them, and to open their ears to the simple commands of the Gospel: love your neighbour.
    • This is a great story with no ambiguity about it. We have an obligation as Christians to feed the hungry. Every hungry man and woman in the world is on our conscience. While we did not create the problem, we can be part of the solution. Our hearts go out to the millions of old and young in the world just because they are hungry, like Lazarus was at the rich man's gate. Allow some prayer today to enlarge your compassion for the hungry and your desire to do what you can to feed them, for in feeding them, we feed Jesus.
    • This story reminds us of the huge inequality of people in Jesus' time and still today. The parable invites us to see ourselves as richer in the goods of the world than many millions. Even by having access to this text, you count among the privileged world. Praying on this story will simply challenge us into care for the needy in whatever way we can improve the lives of very poor people.
    • During Lent I try to hear the call to come back home to God. I join the great pilgrimage of people who, through the ages, have been called by Moses and the prophets to listen to the word of the Lord.
    • I asked for a greater sensitivity to those who live with nothing and think of how I might show some compassion to those whose need is greater than mine.  
    • The rich man had some feeling for his brothers, if little for the poor man at his gate. I pray that my sense of fellowship be broader than any limits of class, country or religion that the world teaches me to observe.
    • God’s message is abundantly clear, Jesus says. I ask God to help me to perceive, attend and follow God’s word in this day.