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John 21:15-19

When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, "Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Feed my lambs." A second time he said to him, "Simon son of John, do you love me?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Tend my sheep." He said to him the third time, "Simon son of John, do you love me?" Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, "Do you love me?" And he said to him, "Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Feed my sheep. Very truly, I tell you, when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go." (He said this to indicate the kind of death by which he would glorify God.) After this he said to him, "Follow me."

John 21:15-19
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Peter, despite his failings, is chosen to continue the ministry of Jesus by humble service to others. Jesus gives me a ministry of service also. Am I aware of it? Do I carry it out even if it means pain?
    • What answer do I give when, like Peter, I am questioned regarding the extent of my love for Jesus? Can I at least say ‘You know that I try to love you.’
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Three times Peter answers Jesus that he loves him. He means it. Yet, gripped by fear and confusion during the Passion he was unable to admit even to knowing Jesus. Could this happen him again? Jesus understands and forgives our human frailties but he never ceases to say to us ‘Follow me’.
    • As babies we are entirely dependent on others. As we grow, however, we claim more and more independence. Then we find it hard to let go of that independence in old age. Life is a circle that takes us back to the beginning. Letting go and accepting help is easier if I trust in God’s goodness and care. ‘Old age comes from God and leads on to God’ (Teilhard de Chardin).
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    • Peter must have wondered ‘Where do I stand now?’ ‘Am I still his number one?’ But Jesus shows him amazing courtesy and kindness, and all doubts are dispelled. Peter becomes a new creation: a fisherman turns shepherd.
    • Lord, I see here your unbounded mercy and forgiving love for me. You remind me that everything in the world is redeemable because of your rising from the dead. From your acceptance of me may I learn how to accept others who fail me.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Three times Jesus gently asks Peter, ‘Do you love me?’ He does not admonish him for his betrayals! Because he loves, Peter is re-instated, and given a great responsibility to care for the Early Christian community.
    • If Jesus were to ask me, ‘Do you love me?’ how would I respond? Many women and men, down the ages, have given their lives for Christ. How would I feel if I were asked to do the same? Can I at least be a good follower of Jesus?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • This is a scene to savour slowly. John's gospel summarises what was probably a long morning's conversation between Jesus and Peter. When I have made a fool of myself, I hate to be reminded of it. Jesus with his triple questioning is reminding Peter of his triple betrayal - the most painful memory imaginable - but he does it with delicacy. Peter loved Jesus before his cowardly betrayal of him; he loved him more deeply afterwards. It led not merely to Peter's emotional declaration of love, but to his confirmation as leader of the church. He can safely command because he is a sinner with no illusions about himself.
    • Many people repeat often in prayer, ‘Lord you know I love you’. It’s a humble prayer because often we feel we don’t live up to our call from God or to the goodness of love we receive in life. We may feel the shame Peter felt on looking at his history of denying his friend, Jesus. God looks into the heart and sees what we would like to be, as well as seeing what we have done in life. Prayer is giving our time to be aware that God is looking into our hearts and loving us for who we are.
    • To be a disciple of Jesus is to be asked the question often, 'Do you love me?' it is not the that Jesus doubts us, but he wants us to recognise how we express that love. Guided by St Ignatius, I might ask, 'What have I done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What will I do?'
    • Peter realises that he is being given increasing responsibility for the flock. How graciously do I accept growing responsibility?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This is a scene to savour slowly. John's gospel summarises what was probably a long morning's conversation between Jesus and Peter. When I have made a fool of myself, I hate to be reminded of it. Jesus with his triple questioning is reminding Peter of his triple betrayal - the most painful memory imaginable - but he does it with delicacy. Peter loved Jesus before his cowardly betrayal of him; he loved him more deeply afterwards. It led not merely to Peter's emotional declaration of love, but to his confirmation as leader of the church. He can safely command because he is a sinner with no illusions about himself.
    • Many people repeat often in prayer, ‘Lord you know I love you’. It’s a humble prayer because often we feel we don’t live up to our call from God or to the goodness of love we receive in life. We may feel the shame Peter felt on looking at his history of denying his friend, Jesus. God looks into the heart and sees what we would like to be, as well as seeing what we have done in life. Prayer is giving our time to be aware that God is looking into our hearts and loving us for who we are.
    • To be a disciple of Jesus is to be asked the question often, 'Do you love me?' it is not the that Jesus doubts us, but he wants us to recognise how we express that love. Guided by St Ignatius, I might ask, 'What have I done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What will I do?'
    • Peter realises that he is being given increasing responsibility for the flock. How graciously do I accept growing responsibility?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This is a scene to savour slowly. John's gospel summarises what was probably a long morning's conversation between Jesus and Peter. When I have made a fool of myself, I hate to be reminded of it. Jesus with his triple questioning is reminding Peter of his triple betrayal - the most painful memory imaginable - but he does it with delicacy. Peter loved Jesus before his cowardly betrayal of him; he loved him more deeply afterwards. It led not merely to Peter's emotional declaration of love, but to his confirmation as leader of the church. He can safely command because he is a sinner with no illusions about himself.
    • Many people repeat often in prayer, ‘Lord you know I love you’. It’s a humble prayer because often we feel we don’t live up to our call from God or to the goodness of love we receive in life. We may feel the shame Peter felt on looking at his history of denying his friend, Jesus. God looks into the heart and sees what we would like to be, as well as seeing what we have done in life. Prayer is giving our time to be aware that God is looking into our hearts and loving us for who we are.
    • To be a disciple of Jesus is to be asked the question often, 'Do you love me?' it is not the that Jesus doubts us, but he wants us to recognise how we express that love. Guided by St Ignatius, I might ask, 'What have I done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What will I do?'
    • Peter realises that he is being given increasing responsibility for the flock. How graciously do I accept growing responsibility?
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • This is a scene to savour slowly. John's gospel summarises what was probably a long morning's conversation between Jesus and Peter. When I have made a fool of myself, I hate to be reminded of it. Jesus with his triple questioning is reminding Peter of his triple betrayal - the most painful memory imaginable - but he does it with delicacy. Peter loved Jesus before his cowardly betrayal of him; he loved him more deeply afterwards. It led not merely to Peter's emotional declaration of love, but to his confirmation as leader of the church. He can safely command because he is a sinner with no illusions about himself.
    • Many people repeat often in prayer, ‘Lord you know I love you’. It’s a humble prayer because often we feel we don’t live up to our call from God or to the goodness of love we receive in life. We may feel the shame Peter felt on looking at his history of denying his friend, Jesus. God looks into the heart and sees what we would like to be, as well as seeing what we have done in life. Prayer is giving our time to be aware that God is looking into our hearts and loving us for who we are.
    • To be a disciple of Jesus is to be asked the question often, 'Do you love me?' it is not the that Jesus doubts us, but he wants us to recognise how we express that love. Guided by St Ignatius, I might ask, 'What have I done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What will I do?'
    • Peter realises that he is being given increasing responsibility for the flock. How graciously do I accept growing responsibility?