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John 1:43-51

The next day Jesus decided to go to Galilee. He found Philip and said to him, "Follow me." Now Philip was from Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter. Philip found Nathanael and said to him, "We have found him about whom Moses in the law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus son of Joseph from Nazareth." Nathanael said to him, "Can anything good come out of Nazareth?" Philip said to him, "Come and see." When Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him, he said of him, "Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!" Nathanael asked him, "Where did you get to know me?" Jesus answered, "I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you." Nathanael replied, "Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!" Jesus answered, "Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than these." And he said to him, "Very truly, I tell you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of Man."

John 1:43-51
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Nathaniel is sceptical. ‘Nazareth, that godforsaken place.’ Our prejudices cloud over our response to people. ‘Come and see’. Clever arguments do not win people to the Gospel, but an encounter with the person of Jesus will open you up. Else he might have to say: ‘I am Jesus to whom you are giving lip service’.
    • Jesus, child of Mary, I sense the warmth of your companionship inviting me to come and see where and how you live. Only so will I be drawn into your compassion and your way of loving.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

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    • Nazareth was an undistinguished place in Nathaniel’s eyes. Philip doesn’t argue about that. He simply says: ‘Come and see.’ Is Sacred Space helping me to come and see Jesus? I cannot invite another to ‘come and see’ unless I first know Jesus myself.
    • ‘Where did you get to know me?’ Nathaniel is surprised not because Jesus saw him under the fig tree, but that Jesus read the thoughts of his innermost heart. As I sit with you, Jesus, I ponder ‘How do you see me? How do you read my innermost heart?’
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Nathanael may be the same person as the apostle Bartholemew, who is always mentioned with Philip (Bartholemew, like Barjona, is normally a second name). Jesus' vision of him sitting under his fig-tree has lovely overtones. The Jewish ideal of peace was somebody meditating under the leafy shade of his own vine or fig-tree.
    • Lord, may my computer be my fig-tree, the place where I can meditate in peace, for however brief a time, and feel your loving eyes on me.
    • Why the 'fig tree'? It was the place where people sat and studied the scriptures. It was also an illusion to the tree of knowledge in paradise which was believed to have been a fig tree . For the prophets it was a place of 'peace and plenty'. Jesus saw Nathanael as the honest searcher and in this place of learning and peace was open to 'seeing' who Jesus really was. Nathanael could say he was the Son of God, and King of Israel. The true meaning of these titles will come clear on Calvary when a foreigner will say, 'This was truly a son of God', and the title on the cross will read,' The king of the Jews'. As we get to know Jesus we are brought into the mystery of suffering and death in a big way, and this gives meaning of our sufferings and sorrows in life.  Perhaps you could bring to prayer now in your own way the sufferings of your life and the lives of others, simply asking for help.
    • We could spend weeks on this gospel. So many themes of Jesus are here: calling people; affirming them and knowing them; challenging to faith and prolaiming that he is the Son of Man. Allow him say to you, 'Come and see' and be open to what you may see of Jesus' life in prayer and today. Come and see him in silence and in prayer, in love, and in other people, in their needs and their joys.
    • These disciples found Jesus and he would never let them go. So it is with each of us.  
    • "Can anything good come out of Nazareth", Nathaniel asks. People are often judged by where they come from, by the way they speak, by their status in society. Do I do that?
    • When Jesus tells Nathanael ‘you will see the heavens open' he is recalling Jacob's dream in the book of Genesis. (28:12-13) Jacob had a dream that there was a ladder set up on earth, the top of it reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. The dream was about contact between God and his creatures on earth. The messengers, the angels, were those who carried out God's will. Jesus is saying that he is now the unique communicator between God and humankind.
    • Philip's invitation echoes Jesus' words, 'Come and see.' I notice myself growing in discipleship when my reactions and communication reflects how Jesus is.
    • Jesus saw something in Nathanael that surprised him. My hidden actions and desires are evident to Jesus. I hear him acknowledge and affirm the goodness in me that others may not notice.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Nathanael may be the same person as the apostle Bartholemew, who is always mentioned with Philip (Bartholemew, like Barjona, is normally a second name). Jesus' vision of him sitting under his fig-tree has lovely overtones. The Jewish ideal of peace was somebody meditating under the leafy shade of his own vine or fig-tree.
    • Lord, may my computer be my fig-tree, the place where I can meditate in peace, for however brief a time, and feel your loving eyes on me.
    • Why the 'fig tree'? It was the place where people sat and studied the scriptures. It was also an illusion to the tree of knowledge in paradise which was believed to have been a fig tree . For the prophets it was a place of 'peace and plenty'. Jesus saw Nathanael as the honest searcher and in this place of learning and peace was open to 'seeing' who Jesus really was. Nathanael could say he was the Son of God, and King of Israel. The true meaning of these titles will come clear on Calvary when a foreigner will say, 'This was truly a son of God', and the title on the cross will read,' The king of the Jews'. As we get to know Jesus we are brought into the mystery of suffering and death in a big way, and this gives meaning of our sufferings and sorrows in life.  Perhaps you could bring to prayer now in your own way the sufferings of your life and the lives of others, simply asking for help.
    • We could spend weeks on this gospel. So many themes of Jesus are here: calling people; affirming them and knowing them; challenging to faith and prolaiming that he is the Son of Man. Allow him say to you, 'Come and see' and be open to what you may see of Jesus' life in prayer and today. Come and see him in silence and in prayer, in love, and in other people, in their needs and their joys.
    • These disciples found Jesus and he would never let them go. So it is with each of us.  
    • "Can anything good come out of Nazareth", Nathaniel asks. People are often judged by where they come from, by the way they speak, by their status in society. Do I do that?
    • When Jesus tells Nathanael ‘you will see the heavens open' he is recalling Jacob's dream in the book of Genesis. (28:12-13) Jacob had a dream that there was a ladder set up on earth, the top of it reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. The dream was about contact between God and his creatures on earth. The messengers, the angels, were those who carried out God's will. Jesus is saying that he is now the unique communicator between God and humankind.
    • Philip's invitation echoes Jesus' words, 'Come and see.' I notice myself growing in discipleship when my reactions and communication reflects how Jesus is.
    • Jesus saw something in Nathanael that surprised him. My hidden actions and desires are evident to Jesus. I hear him acknowledge and affirm the goodness in me that others may not notice.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Nathanael may be the same person as the apostle Bartholemew, who is always mentioned with Philip (Bartholemew, like Barjona, is normally a second name). Jesus' vision of him sitting under his fig-tree has lovely overtones. The Jewish ideal of peace was somebody meditating under the leafy shade of his own vine or fig-tree.
    • Lord, may my computer be my fig-tree, the place where I can meditate in peace, for however brief a time, and feel your loving eyes on me.
    • Why the 'fig tree'? It was the place where people sat and studied the scriptures. It was also an illusion to the tree of knowledge in paradise which was believed to have been a fig tree . For the prophets it was a place of 'peace and plenty'. Jesus saw Nathanael as the honest searcher and in this place of learning and peace was open to 'seeing' who Jesus really was. Nathanael could say he was the Son of God, and King of Israel. The true meaning of these titles will come clear on Calvary when a foreigner will say, 'This was truly a son of God', and the title on the cross will read,' The king of the Jews'. As we get to know Jesus we are brought into the mystery of suffering and death in a big way, and this gives meaning of our sufferings and sorrows in life.  Perhaps you could bring to prayer now in your own way the sufferings of your life and the lives of others, simply asking for help.
    • We could spend weeks on this gospel. So many themes of Jesus are here: calling people; affirming them and knowing them; challenging to faith and prolaiming that he is the Son of Man. Allow him say to you, 'Come and see' and be open to what you may see of Jesus' life in prayer and today. Come and see him in silence and in prayer, in love, and in other people, in their needs and their joys.
    • These disciples found Jesus and he would never let them go. So it is with each of us.  
    • "Can anything good come out of Nazareth", Nathaniel asks. People are often judged by where they come from, by the way they speak, by their status in society. Do I do that?
    • When Jesus tells Nathanael ‘you will see the heavens open' he is recalling Jacob's dream in the book of Genesis. (28:12-13) Jacob had a dream that there was a ladder set up on earth, the top of it reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. The dream was about contact between God and his creatures on earth. The messengers, the angels, were those who carried out God's will. Jesus is saying that he is now the unique communicator between God and humankind.
    • Philip's invitation echoes Jesus' words, 'Come and see.' I notice myself growing in discipleship when my reactions and communication reflects how Jesus is.
    • Jesus saw something in Nathanael that surprised him. My hidden actions and desires are evident to Jesus. I hear him acknowledge and affirm the goodness in me that others may not notice.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Nathanael may be the same person as the apostle Bartholemew, who is always mentioned with Philip (Bartholemew, like Barjona, is normally a second name). Jesus' vision of him sitting under his fig-tree has lovely overtones. The Jewish ideal of peace was somebody meditating under the leafy shade of his own vine or fig-tree.
    • Lord, may my computer be my fig-tree, the place where I can meditate in peace, for however brief a time, and feel your loving eyes on me.
    • Why the 'fig tree'? It was the place where people sat and studied the scriptures. It was also an illusion to the tree of knowledge in paradise which was believed to have been a fig tree . For the prophets it was a place of 'peace and plenty'. Jesus saw Nathanael as the honest searcher and in this place of learning and peace was open to 'seeing' who Jesus really was. Nathanael could say he was the Son of God, and King of Israel. The true meaning of these titles will come clear on Calvary when a foreigner will say, 'This was truly a son of God', and the title on the cross will read,' The king of the Jews'. As we get to know Jesus we are brought into the mystery of suffering and death in a big way, and this gives meaning of our sufferings and sorrows in life.  Perhaps you could bring to prayer now in your own way the sufferings of your life and the lives of others, simply asking for help.
    • We could spend weeks on this gospel. So many themes of Jesus are here: calling people; affirming them and knowing them; challenging to faith and prolaiming that he is the Son of Man. Allow him say to you, 'Come and see' and be open to what you may see of Jesus' life in prayer and today. Come and see him in silence and in prayer, in love, and in other people, in their needs and their joys.
    • These disciples found Jesus and he would never let them go. So it is with each of us.  
    • "Can anything good come out of Nazareth", Nathaniel asks. People are often judged by where they come from, by the way they speak, by their status in society. Do I do that?
    • When Jesus tells Nathanael ‘you will see the heavens open' he is recalling Jacob's dream in the book of Genesis. (28:12-13) Jacob had a dream that there was a ladder set up on earth, the top of it reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. The dream was about contact between God and his creatures on earth. The messengers, the angels, were those who carried out God's will. Jesus is saying that he is now the unique communicator between God and humankind.
    • Philip's invitation echoes Jesus' words, 'Come and see.' I notice myself growing in discipleship when my reactions and communication reflects how Jesus is.
    • Jesus saw something in Nathanael that surprised him. My hidden actions and desires are evident to Jesus. I hear him acknowledge and affirm the goodness in me that others may not notice.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Nathanael may be the same person as the apostle Bartholemew, who is always mentioned with Philip (Bartholemew, like Barjona, is normally a second name). Jesus' vision of him sitting under his fig-tree has lovely overtones. The Jewish ideal of peace was somebody meditating under the leafy shade of his own vine or fig-tree.
    • Lord, may my computer be my fig-tree, the place where I can meditate in peace, for however brief a time, and feel your loving eyes on me.
    • Why the 'fig tree'? It was the place where people sat and studied the scriptures. It was also an illusion to the tree of knowledge in paradise which was believed to have been a fig tree . For the prophets it was a place of 'peace and plenty'. Jesus saw Nathanael as the honest searcher and in this place of learning and peace was open to 'seeing' who Jesus really was. Nathanael could say he was the Son of God, and King of Israel. The true meaning of these titles will come clear on Calvary when a foreigner will say, 'This was truly a son of God', and the title on the cross will read,' The king of the Jews'. As we get to know Jesus we are brought into the mystery of suffering and death in a big way, and this gives meaning of our sufferings and sorrows in life.  Perhaps you could bring to prayer now in your own way the sufferings of your life and the lives of others, simply asking for help.
    • We could spend weeks on this gospel. So many themes of Jesus are here: calling people; affirming them and knowing them; challenging to faith and prolaiming that he is the Son of Man. Allow him say to you, 'Come and see' and be open to what you may see of Jesus' life in prayer and today. Come and see him in silence and in prayer, in love, and in other people, in their needs and their joys.
    • These disciples found Jesus and he would never let them go. So it is with each of us.  
    • "Can anything good come out of Nazareth", Nathaniel asks. People are often judged by where they come from, by the way they speak, by their status in society. Do I do that?
    • When Jesus tells Nathanael ‘you will see the heavens open' he is recalling Jacob's dream in the book of Genesis. (28:12-13) Jacob had a dream that there was a ladder set up on earth, the top of it reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. The dream was about contact between God and his creatures on earth. The messengers, the angels, were those who carried out God's will. Jesus is saying that he is now the unique communicator between God and humankind.
    • Philip's invitation echoes Jesus' words, 'Come and see.' I notice myself growing in discipleship when my reactions and communication reflects how Jesus is.
    • Jesus saw something in Nathanael that surprised him. My hidden actions and desires are evident to Jesus. I hear him acknowledge and affirm the goodness in me that others may not notice.
  • Some thoughts on today's scripture

    Active
    Default
    • Nathanael may be the same person as the apostle Bartholemew, who is always mentioned with Philip (Bartholemew, like Barjona, is normally a second name). Jesus' vision of him sitting under his fig-tree has lovely overtones. The Jewish ideal of peace was somebody meditating under the leafy shade of his own vine or fig-tree.
    • Lord, may my computer be my fig-tree, the place where I can meditate in peace, for however brief a time, and feel your loving eyes on me.
    • Why the 'fig tree'? It was the place where people sat and studied the scriptures. It was also an illusion to the tree of knowledge in paradise which was believed to have been a fig tree . For the prophets it was a place of 'peace and plenty'. Jesus saw Nathanael as the honest searcher and in this place of learning and peace was open to 'seeing' who Jesus really was. Nathanael could say he was the Son of God, and King of Israel. The true meaning of these titles will come clear on Calvary when a foreigner will say, 'This was truly a son of God', and the title on the cross will read,' The king of the Jews'. As we get to know Jesus we are brought into the mystery of suffering and death in a big way, and this gives meaning of our sufferings and sorrows in life.  Perhaps you could bring to prayer now in your own way the sufferings of your life and the lives of others, simply asking for help.
    • We could spend weeks on this gospel. So many themes of Jesus are here: calling people; affirming them and knowing them; challenging to faith and prolaiming that he is the Son of Man. Allow him say to you, 'Come and see' and be open to what you may see of Jesus' life in prayer and today. Come and see him in silence and in prayer, in love, and in other people, in their needs and their joys.
    • These disciples found Jesus and he would never let them go. So it is with each of us.  
    • "Can anything good come out of Nazareth", Nathaniel asks. People are often judged by where they come from, by the way they speak, by their status in society. Do I do that?
    • When Jesus tells Nathanael ‘you will see the heavens open' he is recalling Jacob's dream in the book of Genesis. (28:12-13) Jacob had a dream that there was a ladder set up on earth, the top of it reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. The dream was about contact between God and his creatures on earth. The messengers, the angels, were those who carried out God's will. Jesus is saying that he is now the unique communicator between God and humankind.
    • Philip's invitation echoes Jesus' words, 'Come and see.' I notice myself growing in discipleship when my reactions and communication reflects how Jesus is.
    • Jesus saw something in Nathanael that surprised him. My hidden actions and desires are evident to Jesus. I hear him acknowledge and affirm the goodness in me that others may not notice.